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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Enhancement, fingerprint recognition, fingerprint verification competition and minutiae.
Khan, "Latent Fingerprints Segmentation: Feasibility of Using Clustering-Based Automated Approach," Arabian Journal for Science and Engineering, vol.
Influence of stirring rate to electrochemical fingerprints of Radix Paeoniae Alba
Jain and his biometrics team were studying how to test and calibrate fingerprint scanners commonly used across the globe at police departments, airport immigration counters, banks and even amusement parks, Science Daily reported.
Some of the fingerprint indexing methods are mainly based on orientation fields, such as [2] and [3], while the most are based on minutiae, for example [4]-[10], among them [4]-[9] use minutia triplets.
Most of the indoor fingerprints are collected by human power.
The present paper proposes a minutiae-ridge based fingerprint verification scheme that improves upon fingerprint verification, a biometrics, for enhancing smartphone protection.
It came as Anthony Garrett, a fingerprint officer, gave evidence in the witness box at Swansea Crown Court.
The objectives of the 3-day meeting is to provide a forum for facilitating co-operation, enhancing networking and assistance amongst SARPCCO member countries and also share best practices and contemporary techniques on fingerprint lifting, examination and uploading of subjects into the INTERPOL data base.
To extract the features from the fingerprints we have used a discrete wavelet transformation described by (Tyco et al., 2001) and (Gonzales et al., 2008).
Suprema ID's new FAP30 fingerprint scanner comes in a robust IP65-rated dust and waterproof structure with the ultra-slim optical sensor featuring its proprietary advanced LFD (Live Fingerprint Detection) technology to prevent spoofing frauds.
Samsung Electronics is going to use in-display fingerprint sensors on all three variants of its upcoming Galaxy S10 series.