finger-to-nose test

finger-to-nose test

Neurology A test of voluntary motor function in which the person being tested is asked to slowly touch his nose with an extended index finger; the FTNT is used to evaluate coordination, and is altered in the face of cerebellar defects. See Heel-knee test.

finger-to-nose test

A test of cerebellar function wherein the patient is asked, while keeping the eyes open, to touch the nose with the finger and remove the finger, and repeat this rapidly. The test is done by using a finger of each hand successively or in concert. How fast and well this is done is recorded. This test assesses the function of the cerebellum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Postural or kinetic tremors can be assessed by stretching the arms and performing a finger-to-nose test. A resting tremor can indicate parkinsonism; intention tremor may indicate a cerebellar lesion.
No dysmetria was noted on the finger-to-nose test, but heel or toe gait was impaired.
Fellow law student Nina Mainy tried the finger-to-nose test, and again she managed the task quite easily.
Reliability of the scores for the finger-to-nose test in adults with traumatic brain injury.
A neurologic examination of the proband indicated normal mental status, dysarthria, nystagmus, no gag reflex, finger-to-nose test (+), heel-knee-tibia test (+), adiadochokinesia, Romberg sign (−), without pyramidal or extrapyramidal signs and a normal sensory system.
A neurologic examination of the proband indicated normal mental status, dysarthria, visual acuity below light sense, dull gag reflex, finger-to-nose test (+), heel-knee-tibia test (+), Romberg sign (+), tendon reflex active, Babinski sign (+), no extrapyramidal signs, and an affected sensory system.
The patient had impaired finger-to-nose tests, positive Holmes rebound phenomena and mildly impaired alternating movements.
Some police departments are trying to improve those odds: The Colorado State Patrol employs specialized drug recognition experts armed with a 12-step protocol that includes one-leg stands, finger-to-nose tests, and checking for "a lack of ocular convergence." Although Colorado does not have a legal limit on blood THC levels, it wins convictions on 90 percent of its drugged-driving cases.