finger

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finger

 [fing´ger]
one of the five digits of the hand.
baseball finger mallet finger.
clubbed finger one affected by clubbing.
hammer finger mallet f.
index finger forefinger.
mallet finger partial permanent flexion of the terminal phalanx of a finger caused by a ball or other object striking the end or back of the finger, resulting in rupture of the attachment of the extensor tendon. Called also baseball or hammer finger.
webbed f's syndactyly of the fingers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger

(fing'gĕr), [TA]
One of the digits of the hand.
Synonym(s): digitus manus [TA]
[A.S.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

finger

(fĭng′gər)
n.
One of the five digits of the hand, especially one other than the thumb.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

finger

verb (slang) To stimulate the vagina with one or more fingers.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger

(fing'gĕr) [TA]
One of the digits of the hand.
Synonym(s): digitus manus.
[A.S.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fin·ger

(fing'gĕr) [TA]
One of the digits of the hand.
[A.S.]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about finger

Q. What does thumb or finger sucking mean in ADULTS? People watch the unusual behavior of a person and decide their disorder. I strongly agree, but here is a critical question for you all. What does thumb or finger sucking mean in ADULTS?

A. It’s not a show to enjoy and laugh! It means that whomever you are talking about needs to see a psychologist. I am not joking. Things we are supposed to out-grow but don't, i.e. thumb sucking, imaginary friends or bed wetting, can represent serious problems or mental blocks.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_OVYDwwAu4&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vB%5EOVYDwwAu4_health_posture_1953?q=sucking&feature=player_embedded

Q. I broke my pinkie finger a year ago. It is locked in a curved position. How can I straiten it out?

A. i would let a certified orthopedic look at the finger. treatment is according to the severity of the case. i think Terrany method is about finger physiotherapy. i'm not sure this method is to reshape uneven bone healing. this is a bit different situation, bone can be reshaped, this is how an orthodontic can move teeth- by changing the bone. but it takes a few years. i would go to an orthopedic, i advise you to do the same.

Q. Anyone know why it hurts so much when you smash one of your finger nails?

A. two years ago i closed by accident the door of my car. my thumb was then blocked several seconds before i could liberate myself. it did hurt a lot that i could not sleep anymore. case of emergency. so at the hospital, they took a needle above a flame and then they pierced two holes in the middle of my right thumb nail to let out the pressure of the blood and cell-water who was stuck and which gives the pain. nerves plus body-liquid hurt then a lot. i had to return several times again to the emergency because the holes were closed again, i received heavy drugs to have no pain and lost at least my nail. today you see absolutelly nothing anymore!

More discussions about finger
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this respect, finger sucking during infancy appears to be a potential predictor of the occurrence of other DOH during adolescence.
n Private Public P value % % Nail biting Never 540 13.2 86.8 0.28 Stopped 93 7.5 92.5 Yes 961 13.3 86.7 NI 466 Object biting Never 659 13.8 86.2 0.29 Stopped 48 6.3 93.7 Yes 871 12.5 87.5 NI 482 Lip/cheek biting Never 832 12.4 87.6 0.45 Stopped 29 6.9 93.1 Yes 735 13.7 86.3 NI 464 Mouth breathing Never 913 12.6 87.4 0.82 Stopped 114 12.3 87.7 Yes 527 13.7 86.3 NI 506 Bruxism Never 1148 13.6 86.4 < 0.01 Stopped 90 2.2 97.8 Yes 341 13.5 86.5 NI 481 Finger sucking Never 1317 12.9 87.1 0.02 Stopped 231 15.6 84.4 Yes 56 1.8 98.2 NI 456 Pacifier sucking Never 568 11.6 88.4 0.56 Stopped 1010 13.5 86.5 Yes 18 11.1 88.9 NI 464 NI: no information was available.
This feature is appealing because finger sucking and hair pulling usually are maintained by automatic reinforcement and occur when the individual is alone.
Although the AED has been an effective intervention for finger sucking with 3 children, replication is needed to demonstrate its effectiveness with children who differ in age, level of motivation, and intellectual ability.
Tina's teacher told her parents that the first author was looking for participants for a research project on finger sucking. Although Tina agreed to participate in the study (with the consent of her parents), she claimed that she liked sucking her fingers and that she was not interested in stopping.
Tina's finger sucking was defined as the insertion of any finger past the front teeth with the lips closed over the finger(s).
The purpose of the AED was to automatically produce a tone contingent on every occurrence of finger sucking. It was thought that such a device would serve as a punishing consequence for the behavior, negatively reinforce movement of the hand away from the head, and provide a cue for a change agent to deliver an additional contingency if necessary.
This condition evaluated the effectiveness of automatically delivering a 65-dB tone for every occurrence of finger sucking.
In this condition, an additional stimulus was delivered to obtain reductions in finger sucking. An experimenter sat approximately 20 feet away from Tina out of sight and, when the AED was activated, the experimenter activated the remote control unit at the same time.
During the baseline and inactive AED conditions, finger sucking occurred 54.6% and 46.6% of the time, respectively.