fault

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fault

In legal medicine, failing to meet an obligation; a legal responsibility for a failed outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
On moral-marital-family issues its contributors now find fault with almost everything Catholic Church leaders say or do, while the positions they hold in opposition to them cannot be classified as Catholic."
All are so well-matched to their tales that it's impossible either to find fault or to pick a favorite.
When it was unable to deliver on these expectations, people felt betrayed and began to find fault" (p.
Comer presents it, is that the members of the committee must not find fault with any of the participants (though there would seem to be much to find fault with), and they must operate by consensus.
When we judge, we find fault, place blame or decide who is worthy and who is not.
In other words, I must split hairs to find fault. (An example is, on page 377, "is ...
James Warren's determination to find fault with The Republican Noise Machine by David Brock has forced him to present arguments that are either specious or irrelevant ("What Ailes Us," September).
And while his Teesside roots have grown since then, so has his Eston allotment, to the extent where judges of Redcar and Cleveland Council's annual allotment contest could not find fault.
Meanwhile, this large corporation has probably wasted US$30 to US$50 million in energy costs in the last six months alone, while this corporate group spends its time trying to find fault with a proven technology they have not used before.
It is unusual for me to find fault with the logic of Cathy Young ("Bipartisan Coulterism," October), but for her to use the much criticized (by conservatives) Ann Coulter as a representative of conservatism while underplaying the influence of Michael Moore, who was given an Oscar for his phony documentary Bowling for Columbine and received no criticism from liberals for his contemptuous acceptance speech, is absurd.
Being a "good" Humanist, I was fully prepared to find fault with this document.
Of course, one may find fault with scattered things, from various inequalities of coverage (perhaps unavoidable, given the scope here) to the nomenclature of the Oxford Shakespeare (All is True, Innogen, etc.) that, surprisingly, still has the ability to be annoying.