financial incentive


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financial incentive

A cash payment made to a patient who achieves a health-related goal such as sustaining a weight loss over a 6-month period or maintaining abstinence from a toxic substance.
See also: incentive
References in periodicals archive ?
The Causal Link Between Financial Incentives and Weight Loss: An Evidence?Based Survey of the Literature.
The majority of nurses (85%) in this study indicated 'single status', on the one hand they may have had had fewer immediate family responsibilities; thus allowing them to participate in this initiative which offered additional financial incentives. Conversely, one could speculate, a nurse may have had family responsibilities that could benefit from a higher salary coupled with the employer fringe benefits.
(66) In the early 2000s, the financial incentive structure of the CHP
Significantly more individuals in the financial incentive group than in the control group enrolled in (15% vs.
One such alternative is offering financial incentives to living kidney donors.
Proposed regulations for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 provide guidance that enables employer-sponsored wellness programs to aggressively promote and reward healthy behaviors using significant financial incentives. The act includes provisions to prohibit a medical plan from discriminating in eligibility or premiums based on health factors of individuals, but wellness incentives are allowed.
Interestingly, some individuals are offended at the idea of their family benefiting from the sale of their organs, however, they favor being able to receive the financial incentive themselves for a family member's organs.
HMOs also use legal and financial incentives to keep their providers from complaining about poor quality either to patients or to the press.
This paper describes some of the new financial incentive programs being tested and provides some estimates of their likelihood of success.
Berenson and Rice (2015) advocate for "incentive neutrality" as a design principle for physician payment methods that promotes neither over-nor underutilization of health care services; Roland and Dudley (2015) consider it critical that financial incentives be aligned with professional values; Conrad (2015) argues for provider involvement in the development, implementation, and evaluation of P4P.
This paper analyses the role of financial and non financial incentives in motivating the health work force.
The financial incentive in the form of a $10,000 tax credit or premium free insurance policy to be received by the designated beneficiary upon the successful transplantation of the donor's organs, is designed to get millions of citizens to sign a donor card, tax return or driver's license application.

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