film

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film

 [film]
1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g., gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.
bite-wing film an x-ray film with a protruding tab to be held between the upper and lower teeth, used for a bite-wing radiograph of oral structures.
gelatin film, absorbable a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
spot film a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained either by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced. See also spot-film radiography.
x-ray film film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
Cross-sectional view of radiographic film. The bulk of the film is the base. The emulsion contains the diagnostic information. From Bushong, 2001.

film

(film),
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. A radiograph (colloq.).

film

(fĭlm)
n.
1. A light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or membranous coating.

film

(film)
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. Colloquially, a radiograph.

film

(film)
1. Thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used for radiographs.
2. A radiograph (colloq.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Why he's powerful: Gray is part of the elite club of Hollywood directors whose films have surpassed the $100 million mark at the box office.
Shrink film like label sleeves is also unlikely to be shipped from overseas because it needs a temperature-controlled environment.
There are many factors that can impact the amount of royalties paid to various contributors to a film. One is whether the royalties are based on net profits or first-dollar-gross.
Those familiar with the three features from their clandestine circulation will find the most profound revelations in the three almost completely unseen if not utterly unknown early films (grouped together on the disc titled "Contre le cinema"): Hurlements en faveur de Sade (Howlings in Favor of Sade, 1952), On the Passage, and Critique de la separation (Critique of Separation, 1961).
But it is a summer film, so I had to wait for the summer of 2004 to shoot it and it took me a long time to complete it.
A range of scholars, including Daniel Walkowitz, Robert Brent Toplin, Tony Barta, John O'Connor and Robert Rosenstone deserve to be recognized for their pioneering work in the field of film and history, advancing above all the standard of accuracy in historical films.
About three years ago a friend told Robinson about POWER UP, a Hollywood networking organization that gives grants to lesbian filmmakers to make short films about the queer experience.
Another one of the more popular films to come out of Egypt over the last decade is Atef Hetata's 1999 film Closed Doors.
The main showings are at the Walter Reade Theater (co-sponsored by the Film Society of Lincoln Center).
Considering the cost of energy used for lighting and HVAC operation due to conventional films inability to transmit sufficient visible light, the payback for conventional film and spectrally selective film becomes comparable.
Even though there are parallels between the films in terms of their racial politics (e.g., questions about social and political power and how racial bias is inherent within these power structures), Singleton's Shaft is ultimately not part of anything larger than his own personal vendetta.
Utilizing Hollywood movies, 1950's educational films, personal home movies and religious films spanning the history of cinema, Jay Rosenblatt, a Jew growing up in a largely Christian community and culture, depicts with humor and pathos his childhood fear of Jesus Christ.