film

(redirected from film packet)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

film

 [film]
1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g., gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.
bite-wing film an x-ray film with a protruding tab to be held between the upper and lower teeth, used for a bite-wing radiograph of oral structures.
gelatin film, absorbable a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
spot film a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained either by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced. See also spot-film radiography.
x-ray film film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
Cross-sectional view of radiographic film. The bulk of the film is the base. The emulsion contains the diagnostic information. From Bushong, 2001.

film

(film),
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. A radiograph (colloq.).

film

(fĭlm)
n.
1. A light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or membranous coating.

film

(film)
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. Colloquially, a radiograph.

film

(film)
1. Thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used for radiographs.
2. A radiograph (colloq.)
References in periodicals archive ?
The paralleling ring is correctly oriented when the assistant sees the plain white side of the film packet when looking directly through the ring, and the dental X-ray film appears centered when looking directly through the ring.
In general, prior to placing the XCP-ORA device, the assistant should briefly look inside the patient's mouth to identify intra-oral structures that a dental X-ray film packet may impinge upon.
In general, the assistant should continuously observe the locations of the comers and edges of the dental X-ray film packet while placing an XCP device to ensure that the comers are not aggressively pushing into sensitive intra-oral structures.
Only 65 percent reported always wearing gloves while opening film packets, 18 percent reported always dropping the film packets out of the packet without touching, and only nine percent reported always removing gloves before placing films into the processor.
In using this method, all film packets are opened and the film is dropped without touching onto an uncontaminated surface or paper towel.
Watson Foods Co., Inc., West Haven, Conn., offers a broad range of custom-blended dry and oil-based ingredients in edible film packets. These edible films are manufactured by Watson's sister company, Polymer Films, Inc., Rockville, Conn., and can be custom-made to suit exacting processing applications.
Two types of edible film packets are available: One is cold water-soluble and hot water-insoluble, and the other is completely water-soluble from 32 F to 212 F and exhibits excellent oxygen and nitrogen barrier properties.