emulsion

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emulsion

 [e-mul´shun]
a mixture of two immiscible liquids, one being dispersed throughout the other in small droplets; a colloid system in which both the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium are liquids. Margarine, cold cream, and various medicated ointments are emulsions. In some emulsions the suspended particles tend to join together and settle out; hence the container must be shaken each time the emulsion is used.
film emulsion a dehydrated gel emulsion of light- or radiation-sensitive silver halide that is applied to a suitable base.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn),
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase) (for example, oil in water [milk] or water in oil [mayonnaise]).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

emulsion

Pharmacology A suspension of droplets of one liquid in another–eg, oil, water. See Emulsifier.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of very small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules, throughout the other.
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]
References in periodicals archive ?
A film emulsion actually separates when overexposed, leaving a visible band around the highlights.
It was an overwhelming experience, one of unfathomable mystery and emotionally delirious "otherness." Opening one's eyes to its faded, "pasty," incredibly unplaceable beauties was to experience the radiance of angels - not the fallen type, but the real and inexplicable "nonhuman" kind - a blinding white acid that bleached the film emulsion as it passed through a mere camera.
His work these days tends toward gorgeous, pure abstraction, involving film emulsion or etching directly on frames.
'What we did is we took that base knowledge and expertise that they had in making photographic film emulsions and we significantly, significantly invested in it to bring it well beyond the current state-of-the-art."
Apart from a poor 1925 image, by the 1970s better film emulsions did on occasion record shadow bands.