figure-ground relationship

figure-ground relationship

[fig′(y)ər]
Etymology: L, figura, form; AS, grund + L, relatus, carry back
a perceptual field that is divided into a figure, which is the object of focus, and a diffuse background. See also ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Which figure-ground relationship do you believe works best?
The surface of rough felt, on the one hand, and the granular, volcanic texture of the combustion, on the other, remain distinct (irregularities are visible only upon close examination) but removed from any hierarchical figure-ground relationship.
Metaphor-as-gestalt has become one of the important postulates in cognitive poetics, although its understanding as well as the issue of figure-ground relationship may undergo different scholarly interpretations (Freeman 2000, 2009; Stockwell 2002; Tsur 2009, 2012).
Instead of the child-like fruit on the tree being the cynosure our eyes were led to look at the blandly painted woman who lacked a figure-ground relationship even though it gave the impression of being connected to the tree.
Yet, despite fissures of overly familiar, unsightly weather symbols, blocks of color obstructing the surface, and a fragmented figure-ground relationship, Koch's approach imparts clarity: with the composed and confident laxity of a--dare I say--cerebral painter, Koch discards his usual density and applies single layers of paint, preserving areas of exposed canvas with a minimum of compositional reworking.
In the figure-ground relationship between Whitman as author and "Whitmanian" as cultural authority, between singer and music, Leypoldt thoroughly shifts the focus toward the ground and away from the figure.
Wilkins and colleagues have proposed an implicational hierarchy for what types of Figure-Ground relationship enter into this BLC (Kita and Walsh Dickey 1998: 55-69; Ameka and Levinson this issue).
The light-colored abrasive dust settling into the recessed nooks and crannies of a seal during drilling would have established a helpful figure-ground relationship.
In some artworks, the figure-ground relationship becomes the primary focus: think of the hidden figure paintings that were popular in the late nineteenth century, in which, for example, the foliage of tree branches might come together around the shape of a man staring out to sea.
Even my oldest groups have had problems establishing a figure-ground relationship in relief work.
But the discs are not autonomously drawn circles; rather, they're produced by changes in the color of the gridded lines, distorting the figure-ground relationship and ushering in an irreconcilable visual instability.
This, it seemed to me, would have produced a perfectly integrated figure-ground relationship.