figure


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Related to figure: figure of speech, Go figure

figure

 [fig´ūr]
an object of a particular form or shape.
hexaxial figure a figure consisting of the axes of the six limb leads drawn through a central point.
triaxial figure a figure formed by the axes of the three bipolar limb leads drawn through a central point.

fig·ure

(fig'yūr),
1. A form or shape.
2. A person representing the essential aspects of a particular role (for example, relating to one's male boss as a father figure or to one's female teacher as a mother figure).
3. A form, shape, outline, or representation of an object or person.
[L. figura, fr fingo, to shape, fashion]

fig·ure

(fig'yŭr)
1. A form or shape.
2. A person representing the essential aspects of a particular role.
3. A form, shape, outline, or representation of an object or person.
[L. figura, fr fingo, to shape, fashion]

figure

A part or pattern in the visual field which has the perceptual attribute of completeness and is perceived as distinct from the rest of the field which forms the ground. Example: a printed word against a background page.
ambiguous figure An image or drawing arranged in such a way that its perception oscillates or flips involuntarily between, usually, two interpretations even though the retinal image remains constant, thus indicating that higher cortical processing are involved. Syn. reversible figure. See Blivet figure; Kanizsa figure; illusion; Necker cube; Rubin's vase; Schroeder's staircase.
Blivet figure An 'impossible' figure in which three apparently solid tubes are attached at one end of a rectangular base which projects only two bars (Fig. F4). See Necker cube; Schroeder's staircase; Rubin's vase.
fortification figure See scintillating scotoma.
Kanizsa figure An ambiguous figure in which the illusory contour of a square (or triangle) appears in the middle of four (or three) truncated solid squares (or circles). It is an illustration of the perceptual ability to make sense of an incomplete figure by creating a 'whole' image from the separate elements (Gestalt organization). Some people cannot perceive the contour. Syn. Kanizsa square (Fig. F5).reversible f. See ambiguous figure.
Fig. F4 Blivet figureenlarge picture
Fig. F4 Blivet figure
Fig. F5 Kanisza figureenlarge picture
Fig. F5 Kanisza figure

Patient discussion about figure

Q. how do i figure if my daughter is autistic? sometimes i get the idea that she's act a little different than the others but than again , it doesn't mean a lot .. i think my question is by what definitions and with what tools i would be able to get to a conclusion if my child deserve a special attention or it is just in my mind ....

A. first of all= how old is your daughter? when i asked a professional he said there isn't a way to know before the age of 3. but any way- there isn't a medical test (like blood test etc.) that can definitely tell that she is autistic. it is done mostly with observations, sometimes testing for other problems that comes along with autism.

Q. I have chronic pancreatitus, and my doctor cannot figure out why my pain is in my kidney area (right flank)? Does anybody know why that is?

A. Pancreatic pain can sometimes cause refferred pain to the waist and back in a "belt-shape" form. This is due to the nerve supply to the pancreas and its origin. I would also recommend to get an ultrasound of the kidney just to make sure there is no pathology there.

More discussions about figure
References in classic literature ?
A stage-driver sat at one of the windows, reading a penny paper of the day --the Boston Times--and presenting a figure which could nowise be brought into any picture of "Times in Boston" seventy or a hundred years ago.
The brilliantly-lighted apartments were thronged with figures that seemed to have stepped from the dark canvas of historic portraits, or to have flitted forth from the magic pages of romance, or at least to have flown hither from one of the London theatres, without a change of garments.
SOCRATES: Well then, you are now in a condition to understand my definition of figure. I define figure to be that in which the solid ends; or, more concisely, the limit of solid.
SOCRATES: The answer, Meno, was in the orthodox solemn vein, and therefore was more acceptable to you than the other answer about figure.
'"I say," expostulated the figure, looking very much scared; "don't do that again."
'"Because it gives me pain all over," replied the figure. "Sigh as much as you please: that does me good."
At last the old witch clinched her fist and shook it at the figure. Not that she was positively angry, but merely acting on the principle--perhaps untrue, or not the only truth, though as high a one as Mother Rigby could be expected to attain--that feeble and torpid natures, being incapable of better inspiration, must be stirred up by fear.
Some narrators of this legend hold the opinion that Mother Rigby's conjurations and the fierceness of her will had compelled a familiar spirit into the figure, and that the voice was his.
Every time he pulled out the frame of a new glass, a new black figure of Father Brown appeared; the absurd glass chamber was full of Father Browns, upside down in the air like angels, turning somersaults like acrobats, turning their backs to everybody like very rude persons.
So absorbed was he that he did not note the approaching dusk, until it was quite upon him and the figures were blurred.
Rostov had just prepared a card, by bending the corner of which he meant to double the three thousand just put down to his score, when Dolokhov, slamming down the pack of cards, put it aside and began rapidly adding up the total of Rostov's debt, breaking the chalk as he marked the figures in his clear, bold hand.
The wallpaper was a fiery red, with huge gold figures in it, well smirched by time, and it covered all the doors.