configuration

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configuration

 [kon-fig″u-ra´shun]
1. the general form, shape, or appearance of an object.
2. in chemistry, the arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kon-fig'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (for example, a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms such that no other arrangement of these atoms is superimposable thereon with complete correspondence, regardless of changes in conformation (that is, twisting or rotation about single bonds); a change of configuration requires the breaking and rejoining of bonds, as in going from d to l configurations of sugars. Compare: conformation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

configuration

(kən-fĭg′yə-rā′shən)
n.
The arrangement of parts or elements in a pattern or form, as:
a. Chemistry The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule.
b. Computers The way in which a computer system or network is set up or connected.
c. Psychology Gestalt.

con·fig′u·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
con·fig′u·ra′tive, con·fig′u·ra′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kŏn-fig'yūr-ā'shŭn)
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry The spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (e.g., a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms, on which no other arrangement of these atoms can be superimposed with complete correspondence.
Compare: conformation
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The Narrative Figuration is the second volume in a series of books presenting the foundation's key works.
In a similar way, Keniston emphasizes the ways in which her chosen poems not only deploy complex modes of figuration but also "interrogate the figures on which [they] rely" (25).
By suggesting that "eccentric figuration" is merely a "warring paradigm" that distracts from the "mutually enriching" relation between the show's other two chapters, Bankowsky reinstates that old logic that complains of the "distractions" of feminist--or indeed, political-arguments from an apparently more important set of questions.
Figuration is a well-known process of semantic change.
These paintings do not oppose abstraction and figuration; they demand we acknowledge how artificial their separation is--and Ghenie's skill at figuration lends that demand its vitality.
This overt denial of figuration creates an absence, a transgression of normal linguistic implications/expectations which does not so much eliminate as call into being by erasing such expectations.
I don't believe there is a line that separates drawing from painting, just as I don't believe in dividing abstraction and figuration.
Elias significantly contributed to the emergence of a relational approach by explaining and showing that: (1) actions are interdependent; (2) human sciences have to move beyond the "egocentric" perspective in favour of a "figurational" (or a relational) perspective; (3) as Goudsblom explains in Sociology in the Balance (1977) the evolution of the social world is the effect of "long-term developments taking place in human social figurations [which] have been and continue to be largely unplanned and unforeseen" (p.
"It was interesting to meet Kiki because she uses figuration and abstraction.
Nearer, on Sturt Street, the centre beaks out over the thoroughfare, calling attention to the rather maw-like main entrance, almost the only obvious opening in its otherwise nearly impervious brown Corten steel skin--a conjunction of rusted steel, abstracted figuration and progression that curiously recalls Massimiliano Fuksas's entrance to the Neolithic caves at Niaux in France (AR August 1995).
If the author is sacrificed to language, it is argued, this is not to be conceived as the mere negation of authorial subjectivity; rather, the author, as a sacrificial figure, answers to the exigency of a figuration that would enable the a priori condition of signification in general to be exposed.