fight

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Related to fights: flights

fight

or

flight response

The general activation of the sympathetic nervous system in response to stress.
References in classic literature ?
As the time went by, he had fewer and fewer fights. Men despaired of matching him with an equal, and Beauty Smith was compelled to pit wolves against him.
He now fights cautiously, getting away from and parrying the Slogger's lunging hits, instead of trying to counter, and leading his enemy a dance all round the ring after him.
He is compelled to fight. But the man in the prize-fight--no; he is not compelled."
It seemed centuries since he had begun the round of daily fights, and time stretched away into a nightmare and infinite future of daily fights.
She made a stream of fire flare from his shield and helmet like the star that shines most brilliantly in summer after its bath in the waters of Oceanus--even such a fire did she kindle upon his head and shoulders as she bade him speed into the thickest hurly-burly of the fight.
Presently, as I shall tell, the white men found in the Butteridge machine a weapon that could meet and fight the flying-machines of the Asiatic swordsman.
Perhaps the president of a corps notices that one of the membership who is no longer an exempt--that is a freshman-- has remained a sophomore some little time without volunteering to fight; some day, the president, instead of calling for volunteers, will APPOINT this sophomore to measure swords with a student of another corps; he is free to decline--everybody says so--there is no compulsion.
He reflected upon the different characters of men he had to fight with, and began to view his situation more clearly.
The battle of Borodino was not fought on a chosen and entrenched position with forces only slightly weaker than those of the enemy, but, as a result of the loss of the Shevardino Redoubt, the Russians fought the battle of Borodino on an open and almost unentrenched position, with forces only half as numerous as the French; that is to say, under conditions in which it was not merely unthinkable to fight for ten hours and secure an indecisive result, but unthinkable to keep an army even from complete disintegration and flight.
This was an account of the fight between a little ship called the Revenge and a Spanish fleet.
If fighting is sure to result in victory, then you must fight, even though the ruler forbid it; if fighting will not result in victory, then you must not fight even at the ruler's bidding.
It was bitter, bloody work, but we were fighting for life and for the Revolution, and we had to fight the enemy with its own weapons.