fight-or-flight response


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fight-or-flight response

(fīt′ôr-flīt′)
n.
A set of physiological changes, such as increases in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and blood glucose, initiated by the sympathetic nervous system to mobilize body systems in response to stress.

fight-or-flight response

Flight-or-fight response, general adaptation syndrome, stress response Physiology A constellation of physiologic responses to fear or perceived stress imminent danger or anticipated pain, which triggers full-scale CNS activation and release of 'stressors' by adrenal medulla–eg epinephrine and norepinephrine and cortex–eg corticosteroids, mineralocorticoids, kidneys–renin, pancreas–insulin Clinical Tachycardia, ↑ blood flow to muscle, ↑ BP, muscle tone, ↑ O2 consumption, sweating, ↑ respiratory rate, tremor, pallor, ↑ inotropism, vasoconstriction, mydriasis, bronchodilation, hyperglycemia. Cf Relaxation response.
References in periodicals archive ?
When you insert this biological fight-or-flight response system into today's high-stress, high-pressure work settings, it's no surprise that intense, inappropriate emotional reactions often result.
Since the fight-or-flight response is designed for physical action, regular exercise is a great way of dissipating the physical manifestations of stress hormones in the body.
Likewise, positive self-talk can stop the fight-or-flight response giving you indigestion.
These hormones, which are central to the body's fight-or-flight response, cause the heart to beat faster and more forcefully.
This is known as the fight-or-flight response, says Dr.
Cortisol is part of the body's fight-or-flight response. Following a stressful event or an injury, the adrenal glands boost the production of cortisol.
That reaction is natural, part of the fight-or-flight response programmed into many animals.
Research has found happiness actually has an important evolutionary purpose, something psychologist Barbara Fredrickson termed the "broaden-and-build theory." Negative emotions narrow our actions down to a series of immediate fight-or-flight responses, while positive emotions can broaden the number of possible scenarios we process, making us more thoughtful, creative and open to new ideas.