field cancerization

field cancerization

Field carcinogenesis Molecular oncology The constellation of locoregional changes triggered by long-term exposure of a field of tissue to a carcinogen; FC may induce CA, CIS or dysplasia, which can be recognized histologically; the remaining 'field,' despite adequate resection, is grossly normal but more susceptible to future CA; FC occurs in any embryologic tissue–eg, colorectal, breast ducts, bladder, bronchial, laryngeal epithelia, and aerodigestive tract in tobacco exposure. See 'Cancerization. '.
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From assessment and treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs) and field cancerization, to long-term follow-up of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), appropriate treatment and staging can improve patient quality of life and reduce health care costs, Vishal Patel, MD, said at the Orlando Dermatology Aesthetic and Clinical Conference.
Clinical implications and utility of field cancerization. Cancer Cell International.; 7: 2 (2007).
Field cancerization (FC) also termed as cancer field effect or premalignant field defect is defined as a biological process in which a large area of cells in a tissue or within an organ is affected by carcinogenic alterations.
Some authors believe that this is a coincidental event, whereas others suspect a field cancerization effect of sun-damaged skin.
[1] proposed the concept of field cancerization as alterations, caused by carcinogenic agent, predisposing the development of cancer and explaining the development of multiple primary tumors and locally recurrent cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract.
The concept of field cancerization was introduced by Slaughter et al., in 1953.
A surgeon's inability to estimate tumor margins exactly at the first look and accordingly surgical margin positivity can be explained with possible field cancerization or possible submucosal spread beyond the clinically and microscopically identifiable tumor.
Fordyce et al., "Telomere DNA content and allelic imbalance demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors," International Journal of Cancer, vol.
A chemotherapeutic option could also provide a more effective treatment in the context of the "field cancerization" theory, which holds that alterations in mucosal cellular biology secondary to exposure to carcinogens (i.e., tobacco and alcohol) affect the entire upper aerodigestive tract.
The concept of "field cancerization" was introduced in 1953, which is the theory of multicentric cancer origins [9].
It's the corner stone of field cancerization theory which was introduced by Slaughter for first time.
HPV-DNA integration is confined to the neoplastic and dysplastic tissue only, so no effect is observed in the field cancerization in HPV-positive tumors [51,52].