novel

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novel

Intellectual property
adjective Referring to that which is new and/or original—i.e., the invention must never have been made in public in any way, anywhere, before the date on which the application for a patent is filed.

Vox populi
noun Fictional prose of book length, the storyline of which has some degree of realism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remembering back to when I was at school I must admit Non Fiction books weren't the inspiring, creative books that we see today.
As a whole, Reading offers many familiar essays to the world of companion science fiction readers, such as historical surveys and introductions to feminist, Marxist, or postcolonial perspectives--all traditionally very useful (essential, even) for creating a multi-focal science fiction reading strategy.
Despite the fact that many of the writers featured in Motte's text differ in concerns and approaches, they all rise up to answer Pound's call since, according to Motte, "they share a crucial will to make French fiction new.
Part 2 of the book consists of seven chapters devoted to "Science Fiction and the Teacher," which really is not at all about the pedagogy of teaching in the field but instead about the earliest writers and editors and how they developed their knowledge of science fiction, and then how they influenced successive generations of science fiction readers.
Both science fiction and religion look at the same world and are asking the same questions," says Richard Chwedyk, a science fiction writer who is also Catholic.
A novel-length sequel to the 2004 film that unfolds against the backdrop of the Franco-Prussian War, Solo features an original and sophisticated story that develops the film's characters in an entirely new direction as well as a vividly depicted and carefully researched setting that rivals any published work of historical fiction.
He ably demonstrates that Lessing's fiction presented science as integral to her world--view but that in so doing she retained the finely wrought prose and depth of characterization that marked the finest of her mainstream fiction.
It's my hope that readers will experience some of this as they read ColorLines' first fiction issue.
Stephen Volk is an author of literary and historical fiction.
The main thing that fiction does is rev up the quality of our awareness, make us more involved in the world, more enamored of it," he says.