fetish


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fetish

 [fet´ish, fe´tish]
1. a material object, such as an idol, charm, or talisman, believed by primitive people to have supernatural powers.
2. an inanimate object used to obtain sexual gratification.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fet·ish

(fet'ish, fē'tish),
An inanimate object or nonsexual body part that is regarded as endowed with magic or erotic qualities.
[Fr. fétiche, fr. L. factitius, made by art, artificial]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fetish

(fĕt′ĭsh)
n.
1. Something, such as a material object or nonsexual part of the body, that arouses sexual desire and may become necessary for sexual gratification.
2. An abnormally obsessive preoccupation or attachment; a fixation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fetish

The abnormal or excessive fixation—usually understood to have sexual overtones or content—on an activity (e.g., overeating, or “bellystuffing”) or object (e.g., shoes or body parts).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fetish

Sexology A device–eg women's undergarments, bra, shoes, or other wearing apparel that is the object of sexual arousal, which may, in extreme cases, replace the need for a sexual partner for sexual arousal or orgasm
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fet·ish

(fet'ish)
An inanimate object or nonsexual body part that is regarded as endowed with magic or erotic qualities.
[Fr. fétiche, fr. L. factitius, made by art, artificial]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Beard Fetish in Early Modern England has been written for an academic audience: Johnston's frequent use of the vocabulary of cultural semiotics renders the work inaccessible for a general readership.
Just as in the example of the God's penny, at the moment of creation of a fetish, religion and commerce are intertwined, as the fetish object held religious signification for the West African population.
Several Welsh students have told Wales on Sunday how online fetish work has grown in popularity as a means of making some extra cash while at university.
Fetish Knights has a star-laden cast including Claire King, Emmerdale's super-bitch Kim Tate; ex Corrie star Nikki Sanderson; Sue Devaney, from BBC's Casualty and Dinnerladies.
Restivo had a bizarre hair fetish and cut women's hair on buses or in cinemas in both Italy and Bournemouth for years so he could touch and smell it.
And it seems the fetish for a random number runs in the family.
SKF is working with French sports car manufacturer Venturi Automobiles to help develop and manufacture the first production electric sports car in history, the Venturi Fetish.
Many people have a fetish and shoes are a common fetish object.
Stone's speech performed not only the undecidability of Tramell's act of seduction, but also the mechanism of fetish formation itself: both Douglas's detective character and his on-screen persona are pulled up short before the horror play of the crime novelist's unhinged, castrated body-script.
Seeing you two in your fetish gear must have been excruciating for Dean.
A FATHER-OF-THREE who had a fetish for bondage, died after inhaling chloroform through a biological warfare mask, an inquest heard yesterday.