feticide


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Related to feticide: Foeticide

feticide

 [fēt´ĭ-sīd]
destruction of the fetus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fe·ti·cide

(fē'ti-sīd),
Destruction of the embryo or fetus in the uterus.
[L. fetus + caedo, to kill]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

feticide

(fē′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
Intentional destruction of a human fetus.

fe′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fe·ti·cide

(fē'ti-sīd)
Destruction of the embryo or fetus in the uterus.
[L. fetus + caedo, to kill]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The most frequent response was that it should be strict 33 (43.12%) so that female feticide can be curbed, while 27 (35.78%) felt it was appropriate.
"The appeals court ruled that the state Legislature didn't intend for the [2009] feticide law 'to be used to prosecute women for their own abortions,'" according to the AP's Tom Davies.
Among the consequences of female feticide is the increase in human trafficking.
This highlights an important issue in the management of women accepting feticide. Human grief is a complex process, and women who have stillbirths experience grief and guilt feelings which are as sharp and as deep as those who lose a neonate.
What is important to note here is that this data is not just about the systematic prevention of birth and continuity of females through sex-selected feticide, but it is also about the widespread and systematic killing of girls who are 6 years and under.
All national medical associations were asked to pay far greater attention to the issues of female feticide and female genital mutilation.
The procedure of feticide has been in clinical practice for the past two decades.
Several scholars and politicians worry that feticide laws turn the fetus into an untouchable, and thus an unabortable, entity.
Historically, the common law did not generally recognize feticide as a crime, but this was because of the evidentiary "born-alive" rule, not because of the substantive understanding of the term "human being." As medicine and science have advanced, states have become increasingly willing to abandon this evidentiary rule and to criminalize feticide as homicide.
Patil also spoke about empowerment of women and said, ''We must banish malnutrition, social evils, infant mortality and female feticide.''
In 1986, The Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India passed a resolution that all federation members should "desist, dissociate, and discourage female feticide as it is 'crime against humanity'"