fetal wastage

fetal wastage

A loss of a gestational product, either voluntary or involuntary, that occurs between the 20th wk of pregnancy and the 28th day of life, a value known for epidemiological purposes, as 'total pregnancy wastage'

fe·tal was·tage

(fē'tăl wā'stăj)
Loss of an embryo or fetus through spontaneous abortion or stillbirth; usually expressed as a rate per 1000 pregnancies with respect to a particular cause, such as maternal infection or drug addiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
An evaluation of expectant management and the factors responsible for fetal wastage.
Pregnancies in SLE patients are characterized by an increased incidence of fetal wastage (abortions and stillbirths), prematurity, and intrauterine growth retardation.
The patients have had fetal wastage of between two to eight with an average of four mid-trimester losses in the group.
Malaria during pregnancy results in increased perinatal wastage in the form of maternal deaths and fetal wastage.
Little data exist on the risks involved in pregnancy with noncirrhotic portal hypertension, but reports have documented rates of fetal wastage in 8%-20%, spontaneous abortion in 15%-20%, and perinatal mortality in 11%-18%.
The key issue is which drug is better able to prevent valve thrombosis and still avoid embryopathy and fetal wastage.
The virus is strongly associated with erythema infectiosum (fifth disease), the transient aplastic crisis observed in patients with hemolytic anemia, arthropathy, and fetal wastage.
The disease can also be a cause of infrequent fatal aplastic anemia and for fetal wastage in the pregnant gravida.
5% in 'AA' group The results of our study correlating with above studies and shows that there is increased fetal wastage in sickle cell trait group as compared to control group.
Sterility and fertility rates, fetal wastage and maternal morbidity in systemic lupus erythematosus.
Enoxaparin can prevent fetal wastage in women with thrombophilia and pregnancy loss," Dr.