fetal asphyxia


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fetal asphyxia

Asphyxia occurring in a fetus. It results from interference in placental circulation, umbilical cord compression, or premature separation of the placenta, as in abruptio placentae.
See also: asphyxia

fetal asphyxia

The serious condition of deprivation of oxygen to the fetus from interference with its blood supply. This may occur from compression of the umbilical cord, as from looping round the neck of the fetus, a reduction in the blood flow to the PLACENTA or separation of the placenta from its bed. See also FETAL DISTRESS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nucleated red blood cells: an update on the marker for fetal asphyxia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1996;175(4 Pt 1):843-6.
Tweed, "Pressure passive cerebral blood flow and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in experimental fetal asphyxia," Acta Paediatrica Scandinavica, vol.
In fact, in a study of 153,593 children, those born to high-risk women who were carefully watched and delivered if there were signs of fetal asphyxia were seven times less likely to develop attention-deficit disorder (ADD) as children born to low-risk mothers who were not monitored, Dr.
This condition, known as fetal asphyxia or hypoxia, results from poorly oxygenated blood in the mother or by an obstruction.(9) Fetal asphyxia or hypoxia may cause fetal neurological disorders, such as cerebral palsy, or even death.
Many factors were included in the study: preterm birth, small size for gestational age, fetal asphyxia, maternal diabetes, minor abnormalities, infection, respiratory complications, and encephalopathy (an structural defect of the brain).
In managing a difficult shoulder dystocia, critical goals are to avoid permanent injury to the newborn, including brachial plexus injury, fetal asphyxia, central nervous system injury, and death.
Continuous electronic intraoperative fetal monitoring (9) is done routinely to oversee the fetal status during labor and is a resource that has proven to be useful to detect changes in fetal wellbeing (10); however, it is unable to detect intrapartum fetal asphyxia and hence the opportunity for early intervention to ensure the wellbeing of the fetus is missed (11).
Obesity and high weight gain in pregnancy were correlated with many complications: gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, multifoetal pregnancy, macrosomia, caesarean section, obstetric bleeding, fetal asphyxia at birth.
At vaginal delivery we strive to avoid fetal asphyxia and brachial plexus injury.

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