festoon

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festoon

 [fes-to̳n´]
a carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the natural tissues it is replacing.

fes·toon

(fes-tūn'),
1. A carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the natural tissue that is being replaced by the denture.
2. A distinguishing characteristic of certain hard tick species, consisting of small rectangular areas separated by grooves along the posterior margin of the dorsum of both males and females.
[thr. Fr. fr. L. festum, festival, hence festive decorations]

festoon

/fes·toon/ (fes-tldbomacn´) a carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the natural tissues being replaced.

festoon

Etymology: Fr, feston, scallop
a carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the external root curvatures as seen in natural gingival tissues. See also gingival festoon, McCall's festoon.

fes·toon

(fes-tūn')
1. A carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the natural tissue that is being replaced by the denture.
2. A distinguishing characteristic of certain hard tick species, consisting of small rectangular areas separated by grooves along the posterior margin of the dorsum of both males and females.

fes·toon

(fes-tūn')
Sculpting of denture base material to simulate natural contours of tissue, including the free and attached gingiva replaced by the appliance.

festoon

a dermal papilla denuded of epithelial cells protruding into a vesicle or bulla. Seen in bullous pemphigoid and drug eruptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the collagen and elastin decrease with age, the malar festoons become more prominent and the skin stretches to form a bag.
In all, there are more than 30,000 light bulbs on festoons placed in the city for this National Day.
Stettheimer and Pollock do come to terms in McGlelland's Cynthia and Angela (all works 2000): The Abstract Expressionist's flung and poured paint morphs into something resembling the arabesque festoons of Stettheimer's twee ornamentalism, as well as lettering that spells out a series of broken phrases "i came to you," "you always said," "my eyes.