ferromagnetic

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Related to ferromagnet: Ferrimagnet, Antiferromagnet, paramagnet

ferromagnetic

[fer′ōmagnet′ik]
pertaining to substances, such as iron, nickel, and cobalt, that are strongly affected by magnetism and may become magnetized by exposure to a magnetic field.

ferromagnetic

(fer″ō-mag-net′ik) [ ferro- + magnetic]
Pert. to a metal (e.g., cobalt, iron, nickel, and some alloys) capable of being magnetized when placed in a magnetic field.

CAUTION!

Ferromagnetic materials are unsafe in magnetic resonance imaging environments.
ferromagnet (fer″ŏ-mag′nĕt) ferromagnetism (fer″ō-mag′nĕ-tizm)
References in periodicals archive ?
Tucker, Monte Carlo study of a mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising ferromagnet, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics: 38, 2406-2408 (2002).
Experiments showed that the ferromagnet, which was observed at room-temperature through thin cobalt-tinted films of titanium dioxide, is colorless, transparent, and one-millionth of a millimeter thick.
Privorotskii, Theory of Domain Structure of Uniaxial Ferromagnets, Soviet Physics JETP 32 (5), 964-970 (1971).
At temperatures below 5 kelvins, all the spins are in line, and the compound behaves like a ferromagnet.
In such samples, we discovered the presence of a hybrid domain wall consisting of coincident ferromagnet and antiferromagnet sections.
Surprisingly, it is found that the spiral invades the hard ferromagnet even at extremely low fields, in contradiction to current theory.
For any isotropic ferromagnet the nature of the low temperature excitations at long wavelengths is well established; in this hydrodynamic or continuum limit the small wave vector excitations are the familiar spin waves or magnons, and the theory works well over a surprisingly wide range of temperatures.
The first step in showing that this may be possible comes from the theory of ferromagnets.
Previously, iron, cobalt and nickel were the only elements to be room-temperature ferromagnets, materials that retain magnetism after exposure to a magnetic field.
This is an edited collection of 10 peer-reviewed papers having to do with studies of physical characteristics of ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and ferroelastics over a narrow temperature range.
23]) as well as the modeling of conducting ferromagnets (via [sigma] [not equal to] 0 in (2.
With properties similar to those of magnets on a refrigerator, ferromagnets use a magnetic interaction between its constituent atoms that align all their spins - the origin of the atoms' magnetism - in a single direction.