ferromagnetic

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Related to ferromagnet: Ferrimagnet, Antiferromagnet, paramagnet

ferromagnetic

(fer″ō-mag-net′ik) [ ferro- + magnetic]
Pert. to a metal (e.g., cobalt, iron, nickel, and some alloys) capable of being magnetized when placed in a magnetic field.

CAUTION!

Ferromagnetic materials are unsafe in magnetic resonance imaging environments.
ferromagnet (fer″ŏ-mag′nĕt) ferromagnetism (fer″ō-mag′nĕ-tizm)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ressouche, "Anomalous spin distribution in the superconducting ferromagnet UCoGe studied by polarized neutron diffraction," Physical Review B, vol.
The study also showed that the ferromagnet has similar properties to a semiconductor, and as such, can be used in designing electronic circuits and storage cells.
Gadolinium's magnetocaloric effect is from two and a half to three times larger than the familiar ferromagnet iron, which orders well above room temperature.
If this alloy is considered to be a single-phase ferromagnet, then based on the mean HFF value of 14.0 T and using the known coefficient <[B.sub.hf]>/[[bar.m].sub.Fe]: 11.0 / 12.0 T/[[mu].sub.B] [14, 15] for ferromagnetic systems of iron with sp-elements, one can estimate the magnetic moment per Fe atom in the alloy, [[bar.m].sub.Fe].
This indicates that, under strain, bulk [Fe.sub.2]Si is first a stable half-metallic ferromagnet and then changes to metallic with increasing strain.
"With chameleon magnets, such alignment would be tunable and would require no magnetic field and could revolutionize the role ferromagnets play in technology," they added.
Privorotskii, Theory of Domain Structure of Uniaxial Ferromagnets, Soviet Physics JETP 32 (5), 964-970 (1971).
The magnetism exhibited by a ferromagnet -- the everyday magnet which holds stuff on our fridge -- is the result of a quantum mechanical exchange among a group of atoms.
"The problem is you need it to be three-dimensional to have a ferromagnet," says Dougherty.
Synoradzki, "Specific heat and magnetocaloric effect of the [Mn.sub.5][Ge.sub.3] ferromagnet," Intermetallics, vol.
These operations can be performed hundreds of times faster than measuring the magnetization or magnetization reversal of a ferromagnet.