ferritin

(redirected from ferritins)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ferritin

 [fer´ĭ-tin]
the complex of iron and apoferritin, a major form in which iron is stored in the body.

fer·ri·tin

(fer'i-tin),
An iron-protein complex, containing up to 23% iron, formed by the union of ferric ions with apoferritin; it is found in the intestinal mucosa, spleen, bone marrow, reticulocytes, and liver, and regulates iron storage and transport from the intestinal lumen to plasma.
See also: apoferritin.

ferritin

(fĕr′ĭ-tĭn)
n.
An iron-containing protein complex, found principally in the intestinal mucosa, spleen, and liver, that functions as the primary form of iron storage in the body.

ferritin

Hematology A major iron storage protein present in small amounts in serum; in healthy adults, serum ferritin reflects the body's iron store, and can be used to detect iron deficiency Ref range ♂ 33-236 ng/mL; ♀, < 40 yrs 12-263 ng/mL; > 40 yrs 11-122 ng/mL; ↓ Ferritin Hypochromic anemia, microcytic anemia. iron deficiency anemia↑ Ferritin Iron overload, hemochromatosis, inflammation, malignancy

fer·ri·tin

(fer'i-tin)
An iron protein complex, containing up to 23% iron, formed by the union of ferric iron with apoferritin; it is found in the intestinal mucosa, spleen, bone marrow, reticulocytes, and liver, and regulates iron storage and transport from the intestinal lumen to plasma.

ferritin

The principal IRON-binding protein of the body. Ferritin acts as an iron store in the liver and other tissues. Each ferritin molecule can hold up to 4500 iron atoms and the amount of iron in ferritin molecules accurately reflects the total iron stores of the body. Ferritin also protects against the toxic effects of excess iron.

ferritin

a conjugated, electron-dense protein concerned in the absorption of iron through the intestinal mucosa. It serves as a storage protein for iron in the liver and spleen.

Ferritin

A protein found in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow that stores iron.
Mentioned in: Iron Tests

fer·ri·tin

(fer'i-tin)
An iron protein complex, containing up to 23% iron, formed by the union of ferric iron with apoferritin; it is found in the intestinal mucosa, spleen, bone marrow, reticulocytes, and liver.

Patient discussion about ferritin

Q. My Iron/TIBC tests normal, Ferritin,Serum = 22. Range 22-322. What is the problem? Iron Bind. Cap. ug/dL 324 range 250 - 450 UIBC ug/dL 206 range 150 - 375 Iron, Serum ug/dL 118 range 40 - 155 Iron Saturation % 36 range 15 - 55 Biopsy = Prostate Cancer....PCA high = 10.2 PSA now 8.3 PSA Ultra W/Serial Monitor ...Ultrasenitive = 8.26

A. What makes you think something is not normal? Ferritin values may be low in some people, and iron deficiency is usually defined as ferritin 15. Do you have anemia? Currently, it doesn't seem you have any problem with the iron levels.

Take care,

More discussions about ferritin
References in periodicals archive ?
Kuhn, "Intestinal ferritin H is required for an accurate control of iron absorption," Cell Metabolism, vol.
Conclusion: This mAb can specifically recognize ferritin and may serve as a component of ferritin diagnostic Iit if other requirements of the kilt are met.
We used a combined approach by examining both the prevalence of the C282Y mutation and serum ferritin concentrations.
The plasma ALT increased from a basal mean (SD) of 45 (29) U/L to 2970 (1540) U/L during AHD, and ferritin increased from 200 (130) [micro]g/L to 18 260 (17 860) [micro]g/L.
The first aim of the study was to compare the recombinant ferritin with the 2nd IS for ferritin (spleen) in a wide range of immunoassays and assign a ferritin content to the ampouled recombinant material.
Under normal conditions, levels of serum ferritin show a close correlation with iron stores in liver biopsy samples [34], the "gold standard" for measuring the amount of iron in the body.
Ferritin tends to form oligomers, and when it is present in excess in the cells of the storage organs there is a tendency for condensation to semicrystaline hemosiderin to occur in the lysosomes.
Also in 2007, findings from the Dialysis Patients' Response to IV Iron with Elevated Ferritin (DRIVE) study were published (Coyne et al., 2007).
TSAT reflects iron that is readily available for erythropoiesis, while serum ferritin level is correlated with storage iron found in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow reticuloendothelial cells (National Kidney Foundation, 2000).
Blood samples were obtained after a 12-h fast on the day before angiographic procedure and total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), ferritin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were determined for all patients.
Serum Hp, CRP, ferritin, and sTfR were assayed by fixed-time immunonephelometry using commercial rabbit anti-human antisera on a BN II nephelometer (Dade Behring), calibrated against the CRM 470 reference material (18).