fenestration


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Related to fenestration: defenestration

fenestration

 [fen″es-tra´shun]
1. the presence of openings in a body part.
2. the creation of openings to allow for viewing of parts.
3. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for the restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.
4. loss or lack of supporting bone around the root of a tooth.
alveolar plate fenestration apical fenestration.
aorticopulmonary fenestration aortic septal defect.
apical fenestration a condition sometimes seen in children, consisting of round or oval openings perforating the plate of bone that overlies a pulpless primary tooth. Called also alveolar plate fenestration.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'es-trā'shŭn),
1. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
2. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.
3. In dentistry, a surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
4. An operation to create an opening in the horizontal semicircular canal to improve hearing in otosclerosis.

fenestration

/fen·es·tra·tion/ (fen″es-tra´shun)
1. the act of perforating or condition of being perforated.
2. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.

aorticopulmonary fenestration  aortic septal defect.

fenestration

(fĕn′ĭ-strā′shən)
n.
1. The design and placement of windows in a building.
2. An opening in the surface of a structure, as in a membrane.
3. The surgical creation of an artificial opening in a bone, as in the inner ear so as to improve or restore hearing.

fenestration

[fen′əstrā′shən]
Etymology: L, fenestra, window
1 a surgical procedure in which an opening is created to gain access to the cavity within an organ or a bone.
2 an opening created surgically in a bone or organ of the body.
3 (in dentistry) a procedure to expose a root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of exudate. Also called window. fenestrate, v.

fenestration

Laminotomy, see there.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'ĕs-trā'shŭn)
1. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
2. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.
3. dentistry A surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
4. surgery An opening created to gain access to the cavity within an organ or a bone.
[L. fenestra, window]

fenestration

1. The surgical establishment of an opening or the formation of a window.
2. An operation on the inner ear, to relieve the deafness caused by OTOSCLEROSIS in which the inner of the three tiny bones of the middle ear becomes fused in its seating. Fenestration creates a new window in the wall of the inner ear to allow freer vibration of the fluid within. It has now been largely superseded by better procedures such as stapedectomy.

fenestration

the presence in an organism of window-like openings, as in the palate of marsupials.

fenestration (fe·n·strāˑ·shn),

n 1. surgery that accesses a cavity within a bone or organ.
2. an orifice created in an organ or a bone by surgery.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'ĕs-trā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, a surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
2. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
3. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.

fenestration

1. the act of perforating or the condition of being perforated.
2. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for the restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.

aortopulmonary fenestration
aortic septal defect.
fenestration heart valves
naturally occurring fenestrations are common in horses and cause development of cardiac murmurs, especially audible in foals. They appear to be congenital and to exert no significant deleterious effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of the azygos artery or a fenestration variant of the anterior cerebral artery or anterior communicating artery have been associated with the presence of aneurysms due to the turbulent flow created by defects in the tunica media in the proximal and distal region of the fenestrated segment (Boleaga-Duran et al.
Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension.
After orthodontic correction of tooth root, it was noticed that complete healing of mucosal fenestration defect had occurred and the patient was completely asymptomatic (fig3).
PROLO economic and functional outcome scale was used for assessing the clinical and functional outcome of the patients following fenestration discectomy.
This article reports a case of repair of a gingival fenestration using an ADM allograft.
On day 163 after fenestration, the patient presented to the outpatient clinic with prominent abdominal fullness.
In contrast, the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) allowed for fenestration decreases in hotter climates, thereby reducing the solar gain.
This turned out to be the first example of the Seattle Energy Code leading to the evolution of fenestration products.
We not only help train up skilled professional installers in the new legislation, we also offer high quality apprenticeships in the industry to young people keen to work in fenestration.
This is an exciting time for Avocet and the National Fenestration Award clearly shows that our confidence in the future of the business is shared by the whole of the fenestration industry," said Dr Jain.
Guided periodontal regeneration using bilayered collagen membranes and bovine bone mineral in fenestration defects in the canine.
Though rare, fenestration can lead to infection, raising the potential for liability-especially if any loss of function occurred.