fenestra

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fenestra

 [fĕ-nes´trah] (pl. fenes´trae) (L.)
fenestra coch´leae round window.
fenestra vesti´buli oval window.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fe·nes·tra

, pl.

fe·nes·trae

(fĕ-nes'tră, -trē),
1. An anatomic aperture, often closed by a membrane.
2. An opening left in a plaster of Paris cast or other form of fixed dressing to permit access to a wound or inspection of the part.
3. The opening in one of the blades of an obstetric forceps.
4. A lateral opening in the sheath of an endoscopic instrument that allows lateral viewing or operative maneuvering.
5. Openings in the wall of a tube, catheter, or trocar designed to promote better flow of air or fluids.
Synonym(s): window (1)
[L. window]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fenestra

(fə-nĕs′trə)
n. pl. fenes·trae (-trē′)
1. Anatomy A small anatomical opening, as in a bone.
2. An opening in a bone made by surgical fenestration.

fe·nes′tral adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fe·nes·tra

, pl. fenestrae (fĕ-nes'tră, -trē)
1. An anatomic aperture, often closed by a membrane.
2. An opening left in a cast or other form of fixed dressing to permit access to a wound or inspection of the part.
3. The opening in one of the blades of an obstetric forceps.
4. A lateral opening in the sheath of an endoscopic instrument that allows lateral viewing or operative maneuvering through the sheath.
5. Openings in the wall of a tube, catheter, or trocar designed to promote better flow of air or fluids.
Synonym(s): window.
[L. window]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fenestra

An opening or window between two chambers or body spaces, or an opening made in a plaster cast or dressing to allow examination or drainage.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fe·nes·tra

, pl. fenestrae (fĕ-nes'tră, -trē)
1. [TA] An anatomic aperture, often closed by a membrane.
2. An opening left in a plaster of Paris cast or other form of fixed dressing to permit access to a wound or inspection of the part.
3. Openings in the wall of a tube, catheter, or trocar designed to promote better flow of air or fluids.
Synonym(s): window (1) .
[L. window]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Fenestral otosclerosis findings on HRCT include ill-defined osseous lucency typically centered at the oval window and cochlear promontory (Figures 1-3).
Meta-analyses have shown wide variability in the metrics of HRCT diagnosis of otosclerosis with more recent reports supporting collective sensitivities of over 90% for early fenestral involvement.
(1980): Stromatolites and fenestral fabric in Early Proterozoic Huronian Supergroup, Ontario.
Weinbaum, "A fiber matrix model for the filtration through fenestral pores in a compressible arterial intima," The American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol.
The lower upper part is thickly massive bedded and the middle upper part 2-4m thick zone is highly porous having fenestral pores.
The lower upper part is thickly massive bedded and the middle upper part 2-3 m thick zone is highly porous having elongated fenestral pores.
Breccia clasts consist of microcrystalline dolostone petrographically identical to the upper entirely dolomitized portion of the Fenestral Lithofacies.
The Cross-Stratified Skeletal Lithofacies is spatially associated with the Fenestral Lithofacies and was deposited in a shallow marine, current swept, environment.
Although cochlear otoscierosis is much less common, when it is present it is invariably associated with fenestral otosclerosis.
Fenestral fabric is well developed and fenestrae show an average size of 0.5 mm up to 5 mm, forming around 25% of the rock volume (Fig.
5B) as well as patches of peloid- intraclast wackestone-packstone with irregular laminoid fenestral fabric (Type b2) (Fig.
It is formed of bioclastic dolomites and dolomudstones with fenestral porosity and locally with evaporite pseudomorphs that were deposited on a tidal flat (Alonso and Mas, 1982).