femoral vein


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to femoral vein: popliteal vein

fem·o·ral vein

[TA]
a continuation of the popliteal vein, it accompanies the femoral artery through the adductor canal and into the femoral triangle where it lies within the femoral sheath; it becomes the external iliac vein as it passes deep to the inguinal ligament.
Synonym(s): vena femoralis [TA]

fem·o·ral vein

(fem'ŏr-ăl vān) [TA]
A continuation of the popliteal vein; it accompanies the femoral artery through the adductor canal and into the femoral triangle where it lies within the femoral sheath; it becomes the external iliac vein as it passes deep to inguinal ligament.
Synonym(s): vena femoralis [TA] .

femoral vein

The large vein draining the whole of the leg that lies alongside the FEMORAL ARTERY.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, this study pointed out many health concerns related to the use of TDLCs, including the predominance of hospitalization of infectious causes, the many varieties of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria grown in cultures, the period of catheter permanence, the prevalence of femoral vein for catheter insertion, the elevation of body temperature, and the high rates of infection of TDLCs.
(7) employed a femoral vein approach to cannulate enlarged accessory hepatic veins.
(c) Injection of the right femoral vein demonstrated flow from the right common femoral vein through the iliac system and IVC without opacification of the peristomal varices.
A 26F dry-seal sheath (Gore Medical[R]) was placed in the right femoral vein to accommodate the AngioVac cannula and an 18F reinfusion cannula in the left femoral vein.
Furthermore, one 6-French sheath was inserted into the right femoral vein, ipsilateral to a 7-French femoral artery sheath.
For haemodialysis catheters, femoral vein catheterisation also accounted for most number of CRDVT (32.3 episodes of CRDVT per 1000 catheter days), while internal jugular vein was associated with the least (16.9 episodes of CRDVT per 1000 catheter days) (Figure 2).
Compression of the femoral vein may cause venous stasis, edema, and femoral vein thrombosis.
Caption: FIGURE 1: Thrombotic occlusion of femoral vein (patient in prone position).
In our experience, the common femoral vein is the more frequently used access point.
(2) Using the ultrasound to And the femoral vein and/or the internal jugular vein can be extremely helpful in preventing arterial puncture, malposition and pneumothorax.
The veins generally used are the internal jugular vein (neck), the subclavian vein (chest), and the femoral vein (groin).