femoral anteversion


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Related to femoral anteversion: femoral retroversion

fem·o·ral an·te·ver·sion

(fem'ŏr-ăl an'tĕ-vĕr-zhŭn)
A condition of abnormal medial rotation of the thigh at the hip joint.

femoral anteversion

Excessive anterior angulation of the neck of the femur, leading to excessive internal rotation of the femur. The normal value for femoral neck anteversion is approx. 15°.
See also: anteversion
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors must have measured the internal tibial torsion and femoral anteversion and correlated the same with corrected toe-out angulation using the MWI.
showed many complications after THA such as dislocation, aseptic loosening, or breakage of the implant in the early postoperative period because patients with this condition have inadequate muscle tension and complex femoral and acetabular deformities including excessive femoral anteversion, coxa valga, and leg-length inequality [10].
Domb, "Effect of femoral anteversion on clinical outcomes after hip arthroscopy," Arthroscopy, vol.
A normal femoral anteversion (FA) angle is an important factor in maintaining hip stability and normal gait in humans.
Material and Methods: We studied 211 dry adult femora, free of disease, by Kingsley Olmsted method to determine femoral anteversion angle.
There are a number of clinical studies about femoral anteversion focused either on technical complexity of measuring the angle in patients (Magilligan 1956; Miller et al.
For instance, it is well known that decreased femoral anteversion in combination with decreased acetabular anteversion is a contributor to early osteoarthritis [5].
Intoeing--more commonly known as "pigeon-toe"--is a very common condition that occurs from birth through late childhood and arises from metatarsus adductus (MA), internal tibial torsion (ITT) or internal femoral anteversion (IFA).
We think he could become the new pin-up boy of snowboarding." Thomas was born with excessive femoral anteversion, a rotation of the thigh bones that causes the feet to turn inwards.
(1994) Silvers & Mandelbaum Increased Q angle, femoral anteversion, (2007) subtalar hyperpronation, and excessive tibial torsion.
Femoral anteversion is not associated with any functional deficit or long-term risk of osteoarthritis.