female condom


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condom

 [kon´dum]
a sheath or cover worn over the penis during sexual intercourse for contraception and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.
female condom a long polyurethane sheath that is inserted into the vagina as a contraceptive; it has a flexible ring that fits over the cervix like a diaphragm and another ring that extends outside the vagina. See also contraception.
 Female condom. When correctly in place, the female condom covers the cervix and lines the vaginal canal with the open end outside the vagina. From Nichols and Zwelling, 1997.

female condom

n.
See condom.
A barrier-type contraceptive device worn by a woman, which offers some protection against pregnancy and STDs.
Pros Compatible with oil-based lubricants; greater protection is provided for the external genitalia of both partners; it can be cleaned and re-used up to 10 times without compromising its structural integrity
Cons The device was not enthusiastically adopted after its 1988 launch, given its high cost—$0.72—the skill required to properly deploy it and the rustling sound the material imparted while in use
Success rate FC has an annual pregnancy rate of 21-26% vs ± 15% with a condom

female condom

Vaginal pouch An externally placed contraceptive device, which offers some protection against pregnancy and STDs. See Contraceptives. Cf Condom.

fe·male con·dom

(fē'māl kon'dŏm)
An intravaginal bag, usually latex, which lines the vulva and vagina and is intended to prevent contraception during coitus.
Enlarge picture
FEMALE CONDOM

female condom

An intravaginal device, similar to the male condom, designed to prevent unwanted pregnancy and STDs. It consists of a soft loose-fitting polyurethane sheath closed at one end. A flexible polyurethane ring is inside the closed end, and another sheath is at the open end. The inner ring is used for insertion, covering the cervix as a contraceptive diaphragm does and also for anchoring and positioning the condom well inside the vagina. During use the external ring remains outside the vagina and covers the area around the vaginal opening. This prevents contact between the labia and the base of the penis. The female condom is prelubricated; additional lubrication is provided in the package. It is designed for one-time use. As a contraceptive, it is as effective as other barrier methods.
See: illustration
See also: condom
References in periodicals archive ?
Innovation is expected to one of the major factors in the adoption of female condoms. Vendors are increasingly focusing on launching products that are aesthetically appealing, affordable and pleasurable.
As regards the female condom, health professionals were identified as the main communicators of this preventive method, showing them as protagonists responsible for health education in the community.
Studies suggest that barriers to female condom use include a steep learning curve, limited familiarity with the device, taboos about condom use in long-term relationships, gender power disparities, cost and stock-outs.
The majority of the participants in the intervention studies (71%23, 56% (24) and 98% (19)) consented to use the female condom. The study with the highest percentage of women (98%) willing to use the female condom involved commercial sex workers (19).
Though male condoms are known to be a protective measure, people are still ignorant of the female condom which is the only woman-initiated barrier methods and its benefits.
Shot at the Kisauni Drop-in Centre in Mombasa, Kenya, this film features testimonials from three young women who are the "number one" fans of the female condom. They partake in a lively product demonstration and proceed to discuss their personal experiences.
Devices like intra-uterine devices (IUDs), male and female condoms, all should be available free of cost, if possible, to those in need.
Slightly less than half (446/1 006) of female participants had ever used a female condom. Of these, close to a third (116/413) 'liked' them, and almost half (189/413) 'liked them a lot' (data not shown).
So far the female condom has not achieved equivalent status to the male condom but it does expand options for contraception and STI prevention, especially for women.
"There are several types of contraceptives that women can use, so the female condom might be overlooked in the mix of contraceptives," said Brady.
Recently, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel of experts voted 15M) to approve a new female condom for use in the U.S.
The FDA approved the first female condom, the Reality Female Condom (FC1), in 1993.