felon


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whitlow

 [hwit´lo]
herpetic whitlow a primary herpes simplex infection of the terminal segment of a finger, usually seen in those exposed to infected oral or respiratory secretions, such as dentists, physicians, or nurses. It begins with intense itching and pain, followed by the formation of deep coalescing vesicles. The process is associated with much tissue destruction and may be accompanied by systemic symptoms. A similar lesion may occur as a result of nail biting during the course of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis.
melanotic whitlow a malignant tumor of the nail bed characterized by formation of melanotic tissue.

whit·low

(wit'lō),
Purulent infection through a perionychial fold causing an abscess of the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): felon
[M.E. whitflawe]

felon

/fel·on/ (fel´on) a purulent infection involving the pulp of the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

(fĕl′ən)
n.
A painful purulent infection at the end of a finger or toe in the area surrounding the nail. Also called whitlow.

felon

[fel′ən]
Etymology: L, fel, venom
a suppurative abscess on the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

Paronychia, whitlow, run-around A purulent infection in the tight fascial plane adjacent to the terminal intraphalangeal joint of the fingers or toes, due to an open wound; as the inflammatory mass expands within the confined space, the vascular supply is compromised, predisposing the site to osteomyelitis, pulp necrosis and sloughing of tissue; the pain is very intense and seemingly disproportionate with the scant amount of swelling and erythema clinically evident Treatment Drainage by incision directly over the site of maximum swelling; the term has also been applied to a localized painful herpetic skin infection 'seeded' in an open abrasion by contact exposure.

fel·on

(fel'ŏn)
A purulent infection or abscess involving the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): whitlow.
[M.E. feloun, malignant]
References in periodicals archive ?
16) Abroad, felon disenfranchisement laws have been judicially rejected on political and human-rights grounds.
What we learned is that after release from parole, felons are automatically re-enfranchised.
Only Maine and Vermont do not strip felons of the right to vote.
This is important because, according to the Justice Department, the recidivism rate-the rate at which felons commit new crimes--is alarmingly high, more than 50 percent for many types of offenders.
In the beginning, felon disenfranchisement "was racial," says Sancho, an outspoken critic of both purges.
Currently, 11 states permanently ban some felons from voting.
Now they were able to prosecute this guy not just on felon in possession, but National Firearms Act violations as well.
They were written as race-neutral but were racist in their effects, as Middle Tennessee State University history professor Pippa Holloway documents in her book Living in Infamy: Felon Disenfranchisement and the History of American Citizenship.
9) Several circuit courts have interpreted this exception to mean that "[i]f state law has restored civil rights to a felon, without expressly limiting the felon's firearms privileges, that felon is not subject to federal firearms disabilities.
21) If a court determines that an alien is a recidivist offender, that alien is considered an aggravated felon because the increased sentence exceeding one year would render the alien a felon under federal law.
25) Any felon convicted of unlawfully possessing a firearm is subject to a sentence between one and five years.