feedback


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feedback

 [fēd´bak]
the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.

This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
Physiologic example of negative feedback. From Applegate, 2000.
alpha feedback alpha biofeedback.

feed·back

(fēd'bak),
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; for example, regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.

feedback

(fēd′băk′)
n.
1.
a. The return of a portion of the output of a process or system to the input, especially when used to maintain performance or to control a system or process.
b. The portion of the output so returned.
c. Sound created when a transducer, such as a microphone or the pickup of an electric guitar, picks up sound from a speaker connected to an amplifier and regenerates it back through the amplifier.
2. The return of information about the result of a process or activity; evaluative response: asked the students for feedback on the new curriculum.
3. The process by which a system, often biological or ecological, is modulated, controlled, or changed by the product, output, or response it produces.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism (e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat).
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback

A feature of biological and other control systems in which some of the information from the output is returned to the input to exert either a potentiating effect (positive feedback) or a dampening and regularizing effect (negative feedback). Too much positive feedback produces a runaway effect often with oscillation.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback
References in periodicals archive ?
Effective educators understand that feedback is not a unidirectional conversation.
Feedback should be descriptive and based on direct observations.
By and large peer feedback has been found helpful (Mendonca and Johnson, 1994; Paulus 1999); however, students with weak background of English language cannot identify problem areas and as a result, they offer inaccurate advice (Nelson and Carson, 2006; Horowitz 1986), but Paulus (1999) believes that this issue can be surmounted through effective training.
As useful as feedback is, it often fails many companies because they fail to act on it.
A demanding goal is likely to lead to more negative feedback.
He also revealed that during the year 2018 same number given above of students and parents gave feedback in just one month in the Higher Secondary School Certificate (HSSC) examinations and the services being provided at their schools.
The lack of adequate amounts of effective feedback in the clinical setting has been identified as a significant ongoing problem in medical education.7 similarly; feedback given in an unprofessional and ineffective manner can also result in demotivation.
Feedback can sometimes be misconstrued and 'often, what a teacher intends as helpful critical feedback turns to personal ego evaluation in the eyes of the receiver' (Hattie & Yates, 2013, p.
Different types of feedback contribute to learning, although perhaps to varying degrees.
Interestingly, if an individual received negative feedback from an employee of lower rank, they became more creative.
The feedback form may have had its moment in the sun, but it isn't so relevant anymore.
Formal performance evaluations require substantial time, data, and paperwork, which may explain why formal feedback has historically been so infrequent.