feedback


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feedback

 [fēd´bak]
the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process. Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.

This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
Physiologic example of negative feedback. From Applegate, 2000.
alpha feedback alpha biofeedback.

feed·back

(fēd'bak),
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; for example, regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.

feedback

/feed·back/ (fēd´bak) the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process; feedback is negative when the return exerts an inhibitory control, positive when it exerts a stimulatory effect.

feedback

(fēd′băk′)
n.
1.
a. The return of a portion of the output of a process or system to the input, especially when used to maintain performance or to control a system or process.
b. The portion of the output so returned.
c. Sound created when a transducer, such as a microphone or the pickup of an electric guitar, picks up sound from a speaker connected to an amplifier and regenerates it back through the amplifier.
2. The return of information about the result of a process or activity; evaluative response: asked the students for feedback on the new curriculum.
3. The process by which a system, often biological or ecological, is modulated, controlled, or changed by the product, output, or response it produces.

feedback

Etymology: AS, faedan + baec
, (in communication theory)
1 information produced by a receiver and perceived by a sender that informs the sender of the receiver's reaction to the message. Feedback is a cyclic part of the process of communication that regulates and modifies the content of messages.
2 the return of some of the output so as to exert some control in the process.

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism (e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat).
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback

A feature of biological and other control systems in which some of the information from the output is returned to the input to exert either a potentiating effect (positive feedback) or a dampening and regularizing effect (negative feedback). Too much positive feedback produces a runaway effect often with oscillation.

feedback

regulatory mechanisms in which the outcome of system activity governs the amount of further output from the system; e.g. modulation of motor activity by sensory stimuli triggered by muscle contractions

feed·back

(fēd'bak)
1. In a given system, the return, as input, of some of the output, as a regulatory mechanism; e.g., regulation of a furnace by a thermostat.
2. An explanation for the learning of motor skills: sensory stimuli set up by muscle contractions modulate the activity of the motor system.
3. The feeling evoked by another person's reaction to oneself.
See: biofeedback

feedback,

n the constant flow of sensory information back to the brain. When feedback mechanisms are deficient because of sensory deprivation, motor function becomes distorted, aberrant, and uncoordinated.

feedback

the return of some of the output of a system as input so as to exert some control in the process.
Feedback controls are a type of self-regulating mechanism by which certain activities are sustained within prescribed ranges. For example, the serum concentration of oxygen is affected in part by the rate and depth of respirations and is, therefore, an output of the respiratory system. If the concentration of oxygen drops below normal, this information is transmitted as input to the respiratory control center. The control center is thereby stimulated to increase the rate of respirations in order to return the oxygen concentration in the blood to within normal range.
This series of events is an example of negative feedback, which always causes the controller to respond in a manner that opposes a deviation from the normal level (setpoint). It is, therefore, a corrective action that returns a factor within the system to a normal range. Positive feedback tends to increase a deviation from the setpoint. In other words, positive feedback reinforces and accelerates either an excess or deficit of a factor within the system. See also homeostasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Was the feedback session descriptive rather than evaluative?
Keeping in mind the significance of effective feedback, the gap in the feedback practices and the utility of microteaching exercise, here we propose an amalgamation of both practices in the form of "Micro-feedback exercise".
Students may find the written feedback very challenging because of its length and complexity.
7 Feedback is taken as a staged broad educational process between the learner, teacher and the institution.
For proving feedback to students' writings, teachers should develop various theory-laden methods because feedback with a rationale behind it can be more beneficial for students than others.
As error corrective methods have dissimilar effectiveness for different types of grammatical items therefore feedback method adopted for corrective feedback should be as per type of error category.
This decomposition allows the introduction of a feedback loop.
f] due to the feedback processes (included in [[lambda].
The third purpose of feedback is perhaps the most obvious, that is, to provide information to the learner.
Hewson & Little (1998), in their study on feedback from a range of students from various medical disciplines, noted that creating a respectful climate rated highly on the participants' requirements for good feedback.
b) Which feedback method best meets the course objective?
Echoing Van Beuningen's points, she also argues that the 'one shot' nature of much feedback research and the limited opportunities for student interaction and engagement in most studies means that very important affective factors are largely ignored in many WCF research designs.