feeble-minded

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feeble-minded

(fē′bəl-mīn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Deficient in intelligence. No longer in scientific use.
2. Exhibiting a marked lack of intelligent consideration and forethought: a feeble-minded plan doomed to failure.

fee′ble-mind′ed·ly adv.
fee′ble-mind′ed·ness n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Clarke's emphasis was on hereditary factors and the whole thrust of the early mental hygiene movement was directed toward containing the problems which arose from feeble-mindedness. (83) Dr.
(93) Success here is measured, not in policy outcomes, but by the intrusion of eugenic ideas of degeneration and feeble-mindedness into the consciousness of leading legal officials, public school representatives, and, but certainly not limited to, medical professionals.
(99) Clarke was convinced that his studies of the financially poor who attended the psychiatric clinic at Toronto's General Hospital demonstrated that immigrants suffered disproportionately from feeble-mindedness. (100) Carolyn Strange has argued that commercialized sex was at the centre of professional efforts to purify the nation, since it involved the co-mingling of races in the poverty stricken neighbourhoods (the "low dives") largely populated by immigrants and members of the dangerous working class.
The story of Carrie Buck, her mother Emma, and her daughter Vivian, provides a prime example of the zealousness of eugenics supporters and the degree to which "feeble-mindedness" served as a catchall term for social nonconformity.
Although Laughlin never actually met with Buck but only read her files, he declared that Carrie was a prime example of a low-grade moron, and her feeble-mindedness was most likely hereditary.
Craven describes how in Ohio, Goddard and the psychologist Florence Mateer started developing a more environmentalist approach towards feeble-mindedness. Craven argues that their clinical practice of examining children as individuals rather than as members of a group sharing the trait of feeble-mindedness, differentiated Goddard and Mateer from the more prominent hereditarian psychologist Lewis Terman.
(24.) Arvay's "my husband says" speech uncannily echoes the following passage from Henry Herbert Goddard's largely popular 1912 The Kallikak Family: A Study in the Heredity of Feeble-mindedness: "A study of [bad heredity] will help to account for the conviction we have that no amount of work in the slums or removing the slums from our cities will ever be successful until we take care of those who make the slums what they are ....
The `family concentration of feeble-mindedness is undoubted', with `accidental non-hereditary types' forming the minority was proven.
(16) Harvey Sutton, `The Cure of Feeble-Mindedness', Australasian Medical Gazette, June 1913, p.
So long as a piece avoids the twin extremes of feeble-mindedness and impenetrability, complexity per se is no gauge of its worth.
By the 1950s psychologists, psychiatrists and social workers no longer focused on moral weakness or feeble-mindedness, as experts had during the Progressive Era.