fee for service


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Related to fee for service: Fee for Service Plan

fee for service

Medtalk adjective Referring to the traditional form of reimbursement for health care services, where a fee is paid to a provider, according to the service performed, by a Pt or a conventional indemnity insurer, after a service is rendered. See Fee schedule. Cf Capitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a big step away from fee for service, and we think that's good for primary care.
Fee for service may well survive, but with payments adjusted for accountability for outcomes determined by quality and effectiveness metrics.
Fee for service, he adds, is a method of compensation that recognizes the value that is provided by distributors in the pharmaceutical supply chain and creates more alignment and accountability between partners in the supply chain.
The Government hopes the hospitals will use Fee For Service to change the way care is delivered as well cutting waiting lists.
Like IPA HMOs, PPOs usually pay their member physicians a discounted fee for service. While HMOs typically do not allow patients to seek care outside the provider network, PPO patients usually have that option.
Funding sources were divided into four groups: Title VII Part B funds, other Federal funds, state and local funds, and fee for service or private donations.
Fee for service is a much more efficient and predictable relationship for both manufacturers and wholesalers, says Mark Parrish, Cardinal's executive vice president of pharmaceutical distribution.
Although the program is currently set up to be fee for service, Medicare is considering offering a per-member-per-month fee that would include drug costs; however, the site would have to guarantee that Medicare will spend no more on these patients than it otherwise would.
Providers in this program are currently being paid on a fee for service basis, but the agency has put on the table the idea of monthly capitated payments.
Indemnity insurance or fee for service. This is what everyone grew up on.
Under fee for service, once a clinical transaction occurs and financial accounts for it are settled, neither provider nor payer has a financial incentive to incur the costs of maintaining electronic records of the transaction.