feather

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Related to feather tract: filoplume

feather

(fĕth′ər)
n.
1. One of the light, flat growths forming the plumage of birds, consisting of numerous slender, closely arranged parallel barbs forming a vane on either side of a horny, tapering, partly hollow shaft.
2. A feathery tuft or fringe of hair, as on the legs or tail of some dogs.
v.intr.
To grow feathers or become feathered.

feather

any of the flat light waterproof epidermal structures forming the plumage of birds, several types of which form the body covering of birds. The principal types of feather are remex (wing feather); rectrice (tail feather); CONTOUR FEATHER (covering the outside of the bird); DOWN (the soft covering to the body); filoplume (hairlike feathers bearing a few barbs at the apex, occurring between the contour feathers). Feathers consist of a central RACHIS that supports BARBS which, except in down feathers, are connected to form a lamella by means of BARBULES. Feathers are now also known to have occurred in some Theropod DINOSAURS (Coelurosaurs) which have recently been excavated in China, and even Tyrannosaurus may have possessed feathers at some stage in its life cycle.

Patient discussion about feather

Q. can you be allergic to goose feathers?? do you get an allergic reaction even through the pillow cover??? If not- I don't know what it is but something in my bed is giving me a rash...

A. i had a similar problem. i just couldn't sleep in my bed and every day i changed one thing to see what is the cause. then i found that one of the pillows causes it and probably from dust mites. you can easily be allergic to goose feathers that can pass through the pillow cover. all you have to do is replace it and see if something changed.

More discussions about feather
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spring, Yellow-rumped Warblers undergo a prealternate (pre-breeding) molt, which includes the majority of body feather tracts and greater and middle secondary wing coverts, but no flight feathers (remiges and rectrices) (Hubbard 1980; Hunt and Flaspohler 1998).
As the season progressed, the proportion of molting birds increased in the catch, and these birds showed both a greater proportion of feather tracts in the process of molt and a greater proportion of freshly molted body feathers.