favism


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fa·vism

(fā'vizm),
An acute condition suffered after ingestion of certain species of beans, for example, Vicia faba, or inhalation of the pollen of its flower; characterized by fever, headache, abdominal pain, severe anemia, prostration, and coma; it occurs in some people with genetic erythrocytic deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Chance exposure to the Vicia faba, by its impact on the phenotype of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, impinges on the expression or the gene, an example of incomplete penetrance.
Synonym(s): fabism
[Ital. favismo, from fava, bean]

fa·vism

(fah'vizm)
An acute condition seen following the ingestion of certain species of beans, e.g., Vicia faba, or inhalation of the pollen of its flower, in patients with genetic erythrocytic deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase; characterized by fever, headache, abdominal pain, severe anemia, prostration, and coma.
[Ital. favismo, from fava, bean]

favism

A hereditary sensitivity to a chemical substance found in broad beans that causes severe anaemia in those so affected if they eat the beans. The condition is rare except in Iran and some parts of the Mediterranean shore. Italian, favismo , from Latin favus , a bean.

favism

a human disease characterized by the destruction of red blood cells, resulting in severe anaemia. The disease is triggered by the consumption of raw broad bean (Vicia faba), inhalation of broad bean pollen or several other chemicals such as naphthalene (found in moth balls). The condition is due to a deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase found in red blood cells, the trait being controlled by an X-linked gene which is rare in most caucasian populations but more common in black populations. Since the condition is sex-linked it is more prevalent in males, although heterozygous females can be shown to have a deficiency of dehydrogenase enzyme.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results can be attributed to the rapid uptake and hydrolysis of this glycoside by the intestinal microflora [9, 30], to highly reactivate free radical generating compound divicine which has been strongly suggested to be the causative agent in favism [31].
The mechanism of neomycin protection was based on the hypothesis that vicine was hydrolysed by intestinal microflora [30] to produce divicine, where neomycin produced morphological changes in intestinal microflora [32] to prevent the hydrolysis of vicine to its aglycone (divicine) which is the causative agent of favism (Vicia faba anemia).
[33], which demonstrated that neomycin reduced the rate at which vicine and convicine were hydrolysed in the gastrointestinal tract, and the neomycin reduced toxicity of both, while this study investigated that neomycin prevents the hydrolysis of vicine to its aglycone (divicine) and protects against the oxidative effect of vicine and this antioxidant effect of neomycin was confirmed by measuring hematological parameters, serum, and liver proteins and transaminases, in addition to liver histopathology and this can be useful in protection in case of favism and hemolytic anemia.
Spadoni, "Effect of factors of favism on the protein and lipid components of rat erythrocyte membrane," Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, vol.
Favism and hemolytic anemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects in North Sardinia.
The pattern of bean consumption laboratory findings in patients with favism, G6PD deficient, and a control group.
Favism: Fava beans contain oxidants like glycosides, divicine and isouramil and other unknown factors.18 Ingestion of fava beans lead to acute haemolysis in some but not all G6PD deficient subjects.
fruit extract protects G6PD-deficient erythrocytes from hemolytic injury in vitro and in vivo: prevention of favism disorder.
fruit extract protects G6PD-deficient erythrocytes from hemolytic injury in vitro and in vivo: prevention of favism disorder," European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences, vol.
It was reported that children drinking bitter melon tea may develop hypoglycaemic coma and that its seeds may lead to favism in those with G6PD (Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase) enzyme deficiency.