fault


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fault

In legal medicine, failing to meet an obligation; a legal responsibility for a failed outcome.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in classic literature ?
Faults in the abstract are each and all so uninviting, not to say alarming, but, associated with certain eyes and hair and tender little gowns, it is curious how they lose their terrors; and, as with vice in the poet's image, we end by embracing what we began by dreading.
"Beauty that makes holy earth and heaven May have faults from head to feet."
He did not succeed in adapting his face to the position in which he was placed towards his wife by the discovery of his fault. Instead of being hurt, denying, defending himself, begging forgiveness, instead of remaining indifferent even--anything would have been better than what he did do--his face utterly involuntarily (reflex spinal action, reflected Stepan Arkadyevitch, who was fond of physiology)--utterly involuntarily assumed its habitual, good-humored, and therefore idiotic smile.
"But it was all my fault. Also I was rude to Miss Wilson, and refused to leave the room when she bade me.
She went to a shelf and took down a heavy quarto, bound in black leather, and inscribed, in red letters, MY FAULTS. This she threw irreverently on a desk, and tossed its pages over until she came to one only partly covered with manuscript confessions.
``Then hang up Fangs,'' said Cedric, turning hastily towards the swineherd, ``if the fault is his, and get thee another dog.''
``Under favour, uncle,'' said the Jester, ``that were still somewhat on the bow-hand of fair justice; for it was no fault of Fangs that he was lame and could not gather the herd, but the fault of those that struck off two of his fore-claws, an operation for which, if the poor fellow had been consulted, he would scarce have given his voice.''
'although I told you, last night, it was not my fault.'
'There; he says it was not his fault, my dear,' remarked the wicked Miss Price.
When an army is overthrown and its leader slain, the cause will surely be found among these five dangerous faults. Let them be a subject of meditation.
Such may likewise be suspected of deserving this character, who, without assigning any particular faults, condemn the whole in general defamatory terms; such as vile, dull, d--d stuff, &c., and particularly by the use of the monosyllable low; a word which becomes the mouth of no critic who is not RIGHT HONOURABLE.
'I meant to say, if you have no compassion for his mother; or if his faults - you have been bitter on them -'