fatty

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fat·ty

(fat'ē),
Oily or greasy; relating in any sense to fat.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fatty

Drug slang
noun A regional term for a marijuana cigarette (joint).
 
Medspeak
adjective Referring to fat.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fat·ty

(fat'ē)
Oily or greasy; relating in any sense to fat.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic individuals is considered as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) [1] and the term encompasses simple steatosis to end-stage liver failure.
While the disease is generally symptomless, progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease can lead to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver and, in some instances, liver cancer.
The researchers measured blood levels of a liver enzyme called ALT--elevated ALT is a marker for liver damage and can occur in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and other conditions that affect the liver--in 635 children from Project Viva, an ongoing prospective study of women and children in Massachusetts.
Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and risk for hepatocellular cancer, based on systematic review.
Li, "Gut microbiota and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: insights on mechanism and application of metabolomics," International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol.
Retinol and alpha-tocopherol in morbid obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obestet.
Keywords: Lipid profile, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), NonHDL cholesterol, Ultrasonography.
He said: "Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is already the most common underlying cause of liver transplant in the USA and, with the obesity epidemic in Europe, we are very close behind.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease independent of metabolic risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia.
Exercise is also quite useful to treat fatty liver disease. Weight loss works.
The non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is most frequent chronic liver disease growing rapidly parallel to that of obesity during recent decades worldwide.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) used to be considered an incidental pathologic finding in type 2 DM and obesity but was found to be strongly associated with features of subsequent metabolic syndrome and was even included in the definition of metabolic syndrome [2, 3].