fatalism

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fatalism

(fāt′ăl-izm) [ fatal + -ism]
1. A person's belief that events will occur regardless of one's efforts.
2. The philosophical doctrine that events are predestined or preordained.
fatalistic (fāt″ă-lis′tik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers of Hejinian's earlier work will recognize the restless rigor of the dislocations Hejinian writes through in The Fatalist. But critics have also noticed that the book is not simply about defying fate, as though to do so were to defy power.
They would have lost heavily but for the expertise of Begovic, and Stoke fans will no doubt get that fatalist feeling as the transfer window prepares to slam shut, with sides like Arsenal still looking for a keeper.
To control for this possibility we include FATALIST. Holding everything else constant, we expect the coefficient on FATALIST to be negative.
Finally, the EU should be less fatalist and more skeptical about China's rise and ambitions toward Taiwan.
A: The fatalist in me says that when a team brings the score back to two-all, only to suffer the loss of a winner to their relegation-haunted rivals seconds later, the Grim Reaper's standing at the door.
Shall we be destroyed because of ancient fatalist political mind control bolstered by absurd threats of eternal damnation?
Listen I am not a fatalist but- we are a culmination of the choices that we have made in the past and the choices that have been made on our behalf.
It can be very easily to let life go fatalist. "Dust: Book for Broken People" is a guide for finding the strength to carry on in life when one faces the crisis of life where they feel nothing that they do will matter and that it is all for naught.
* Finally, the fatalist solidarity sees nature and humans as capricious.
Although we typically see these characteristics as post-modern, they are also hallmarks of the Enlightenment, and in this regard Beatrice and Virgil calls to my mind no one more than the Denis Diderot of such playful narrative puzzles as Jacques the Fatalist or This Is Not a Story (whereas Life of Pi seems more of a conte philosophique a la Voltaire).
Oddly, the 'sheik' is a fatalist in a country whose people had defeated the American invaders and were taking back their country from them.
I MIGHT be a bit of a fatalist, but I am not in the least bit worried about swine flu.