fatalism


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fatalism

(fāt′ăl-izm) [ fatal + -ism]
1. A person's belief that events will occur regardless of one's efforts.
2. The philosophical doctrine that events are predestined or preordained.
fatalistic (fāt″ă-lis′tik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Venal and incompetent leaders take advantage of this fatalism.
Patients with extended families obtained significantly higher scores from the FCS (p<0.01) and its personal control (p<0.01), fatalism (p<0.01), belief in an unjust world (p<0.01) dimensions, and from the PSI (p<0.01) and its thoughtful approach (p<0.01), avoidance approach (p<0.01), evaluative approach (p<0.01), self-confident approach (p<0.01), and planned approach (p<0.01) subscales.
In particular, Straughan and Seow (2000) have conceptualized and identified fatalism as a source of low self-efficacy.
There were five survey questionnaires - Financial Well-Being Scale Value, Financial Literacy, Financial Concerns, Fatalism, and Materialistic consumerism.
Having suggested in the Introduction that fatalism operates as an Orientalizing buffer against selfwill, here Warren tracks Southey's staging of fatalism in Thalaba, as its protagonist wavers between resigning himself to whatever fate seems marked as is, and not.
There's no excuse for wage fatalism. We can give American workers a raise if we want to.
Pippin sets out to examine the theme of fatalism in film noir, which he explains as follows: "Some philosophers believe that if the question is: What distinguishes naturally occurring events like bodily movements in space from metaphysically distinct purposive doings initiated by me, the answer is: Nothing" (13).
You accept a sort of fatalism, where it is easier to believe that all events and situations are predetermined and therefore inevitable.
Isynschtad believes that fatalism spirit in the developing countries makes people to accept whatever happens to them without any disagreement and assigns everything to outer forces and the society.
The 10 articles consider such topics as metaphysical fatalism in five steps, causal tracking reliabilism and the lottery problem, Karl Popper's debt to Leonard Nelson, and reason attribution without belief-desire ascription.
This feeling is further cemented by a hint of fatalism which engulfs our way of life.
It is a mistake to succumb to a fatalism that declares democracy to be an enemy of civilization and therefore of a life worthy of man.