fat tax


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fat tax

A proposed tax, introduced in Denmark in 2011, on foods which are high (> 2.3% by weight) in saturated fat—e.g., meats, cheese, butter, edible oils, margarine and other spreads, and processed foods.
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Diante dessa premissa e atento as relacoes que podem vir a surgir de tal mecanismo tributario, se faz presente a analise do que vem a ser, de fato, um Fat Tax, sua concepcao original, bem como os desdobramentos que o mesmo vem desencadeando na ordem juridica e economica atual.
The fat tax is set at 16 Danish kroner per kilogram (about $1.30 per pound) of saturated fat contained in or used in preparing a food.
Mr Cameron's fat tax might make a good soundbite, but the problem is more complex and the solutions are equally complex.
We have a feeling that this FAT tax for its part will be met with a similar sort of attitude.
Denmark has introduced what is believed to be the world's first fat tax, applying a surcharge to foods with more than 23 % saturated fats, indicating that this should help combat obesity and heart disease.
This study looks at how consumers respond to a fat tax as well as a warning label stating that a fat tax has been imposed.
Other countries, such as Denmark and Portugal, already have a 'fat tax', and Mr Fry added: "The Government really should consider such options as part of the armoury against obesity.
One idea is the so called fat tax whereby taxes would be imposed on high fat food in order to discourage consumption.
The argument for a soda tax or a "fat tax" on junk food is the same as the argument for a tax on tobacco or a tax on gasoline as a way to break our addiction to oil and tackle global warming: When an activity imposes costs on society, economists say that the activity should be taxed.
A MASSIVE 76 per cent of people believe that airlines should charge 'Fat Tax', according to the latest poll on leading travel site Skyscanner (www.Skyscanner.net).
thus justifying government's right to recoup the costs." Another theory proposed by the Urban Institute and the University of Virginia calls for a fat tax. They believe a 10% excise or sales tax on fattening foods could raise $522 billion over the next 10 years.
(60) One examination of a saturated fat tax found that the increased intake of salt due to the tax could actually increase mortality.