fat necrosis


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Related to fat necrosis: Subcutaneous fat necrosis

necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

fat ne·cro·sis

the death of adipose tissue, characterized by the formation of small (1-4 mm), dull, chalky, gray or white foci; these represent small quantities of calcium soaps formed in the affected tissue when fat is hydrolyzed into glycerol and fatty acids.
Synonym(s): steatonecrosis

fat necrosis

Liquefactive necrosis initiated by trauma and effected by lipolytic enzymes. See Calcium soap, Necrosis.

fat ne·cro·sis

(fat nĕ-krō'sis)
The death of adipose tissue, typically due to digestive enzymes (e.g., lipase); characterized by the formation of small (1-4 mm), dull, chalky, gray or white foci.
Synonym(s): steatonecrosis.

fat necrosis

Death of body fatty tissue often as a result of exposure to pancreatic enzymes in the condition of acute PANCREATITIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Encapsulated fat necrosis lesion caused by Morel-Lavallee lesion in a professional ice hockey player.
This view is supported by Karochristou et al, (2) who documented a biochemical profile of pseudohypoparathyroidism in a neonate with hypocalcemia associated with subcutaneous fat necrosis. Minagawa et al, (17) proposed that perinatal asphyxia may have exacerbated the functional immaturity of PTH receptor and/or intracellular signal transduction systems, resulting in the development of transient pseudohypoparathyroidism and, ultimately, hypocalcemia.
Malignant (18%; 31/177) Invasive ductal carcinoma 13 Invasive lobular carcinoma 4 Ductal carcinoma in situ 12 Invasive mixed carcinoma 1 Tubular carcinoma 1 Atypical epithelial hyperplasia (11%; 20/177) Atypical ductal hyperplasia 3 Lobular neoplasia 17 (12 ALH, 5 LCIS) Benign (71%;126/177) Benign breast diagnoses (105/126) Fibrocystic changes with/without 31 epithelial hyperplasia Columnar cell lesions 30 Fibroadenoma and 14 fibroadenomatoid change Ductal ectasia 7 Radial sclerosing lesion 6 Papilloma 7 PASH 5 Intramammary lymph node 3 Fat necrosis 1 Hemangioma 1 Normal breast tissue (21/126) Abbreviations: ALH, atypical lobular hyperplasia; LCIS, lobular carcinoma in situ;PASH, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia.
A knowledge of the mammographic and ultrasound changes after fat grafting and evolution patterns of fat necrosis are helpful in differentiating benign changes from those associated with breast cancer.
BI-RADS 4b or above was made in 5 of 12 patients with fat necrosis, 2 of 3 patient with localized abscess, and 1 of 1 patients with foreign body granulomas.
In the presence of skin and/or fat necrosis, drainage and debridement should be performed without delay.
One case developed subcutaneous fat necrosis right flank around the drain site.
Key words: fat necrosis, lipogranulomatosis, yolk coelomitis, salpingohysterectomy, colonic obstruction, avian, psittacine, umbrella cockatoo, Cacatua alba
Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn: a systematic evaluation of risk factors, clinical manifestations, complications and outcome of 16 children.
Fat necrosis was detected on mammography in women treated on both trial arms but occurred twice as frequently in women who had received IORT (15% versus 7%; P = 0.04) Table 2).
Briefly, the morphological injuries to pancreas were evaluated through five main aspects: edema, acinar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, fat necrosis, and perivascular inflammation.
Histopathology showed acute on chronic inflammation with fat necrosis while histopatholgy of the appendix was normal (Figuer-2).