fat embolism syndrome


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fat embolism syndrome

Emboli composed of fat are common, relatively innocuous and may occur in alcoholism, BM biopsy, cardiopulmonary bypass, compression injury, DM, lymphangiography, pancreatitis, sickle cell anemia, corticosteroid therapy; contrarily, the FES is neither common nor trivial; clinically significant FE may be endogenous or exogenous in origin; most are due to major fractures, especially of long bones, and trauma to parenchymal organs–eg, the liver–most deaths in the immediate post-trauma period have significant fat embolism, burns, blast injury, severe infections, especially α-toxin-producing Clostridium spp Clinical Hypoxia–50% of femoral shaft fractures have ↓ arterial PO2 within the first few days, acute onset of dyspnea, tachypnea, cyanosis, tachycardia with sudden onset of right-sided cardiac failure, showers of petechiae, thrombocytopenia, cerebral embolism–with changes in personality, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, agitation, spasticity, defects of the visual field, and rarely, extreme pyrexia Diagnosis It had been reported that fat droplets in a BAL was indicative of fat embolism, a finding which in one small–34 group of Pts proved to have a low specificity of 26.5%; > 3% oil red O positive macrophages in the BAL are often found in trauma Pts, and may indicate FES or silent FE Treatment No therapy is effective. See Embolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fat embolism syndrome after liposuction: a case report and review of the literature.
Vlok, "Fat embolism and the fat embolism syndrome. A double-blind therapeutic study," Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, vol.
Sharma, "Alveolar hemorrhage in a case of fat embolism syndrome: A case report with short systemic review," Lung India, vol.
Scalea, "Therapeutic aspects of fat embolism syndrome," Injury, vol.
There is almost no role of systemic corticosteroid and heparin, in established cases of fat embolism syndrome. (1) We present an uncommon case of clinical significance, where a boy aged 10 years, suffered from fat embolism syndrome after fall from tree, without any objective evidence of injury to bone or soft tissue.
[4.] Parisi DM, Koval K, Egol K: Fat embolism syndrome. Am J Orthop, 2002, 31(9):507-12.
Fat embolism syndrome: prospective evaluation in 92 fracture patients.
Kleerekoper, "Fat embolism syndrome," The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, vol.
Do corticosteroids reduce the risk of fat embolism syndrome in patients with long-bone fractures?
This led to a condition called fat embolism syndrome, which can cause breathing failure and brain problems.
The clinical diagnosis of intraoperative fat embolism would be supported by the subsequent development of fat embolism syndrome, however this did not occur in our patient.
A diagnosis of CFE was made based on Gurd's criteria in conjunction with neuroimaging results and initial presentation of neurological symptoms.[sup][1] Patients whose initial neurological symptoms were subsequent to respiratory manifestations, as well as those who were diagnosed with fat embolism syndrome but showed no neurological symptoms, were excluded from the study.