far point


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point

 [point]
1. a small area or spot; the sharp end of an object.
2. to approach the surface, like the pus of an abscess, at a definite spot or place.
3. a tapered, pointed endodontic instrument used for exploring the depth of the root canal in root canal therapy; called also root canal point.
point A a radiographic, cephalometric landmark, determined on the lateral head film; it is the most retruded part of the curved bony outline from the anterior nasal spine to the crest of the maxillary alveolar process.
absorbent point in root canal therapy, a cone of variable width and taper, usually made of paper or a paper product, used to dry or maintain a liquid disinfectant in the canal. Called also paper point.
point B a radiographic, cephalometric landmark, determined on the lateral head film; it is the most posterior midline point in the concavity between the infradentale and pogonion.
boiling point the temperature at which a liquid will boil; at sea level the boiling point of water is 100°C (212°F).
cardinal p's
1. the points on the different refracting media of the eye that determine the direction of the entering or emerging light rays.
2. four points within the pelvic inlet— the two sacroiliac articulations and the two iliopectineal eminences.
craniometric p's the established points of reference for measurement of the skull.
dew point the temperature at which moisture in the atmosphere is deposited as dew.
far point the most remote point at which an object is clearly seen when the eye is at rest.
point of fixation
1. the point or object on which one's sight is fixed and through which the axis opticus passes.
2. the point on the retina, usually the fovea, on which are focused the rays coming from an object directly regarded.
freezing point the temperature at which a liquid begins to freeze, for water, 0°C (32°F); it is often used interchangeably with melting point, but should be used for substances being cooled while melting point is reserved for substances being heated.
gutta-percha point gutta-percha cone.
ice point the true melting point of ice, being the temperature of equilibrium between ice and air-saturated water under one atmosphere pressure.
isoelectric point (pI) the pH of a solution in which molecules of a specific substance, such as a protein, have equal numbers of positively and negatively charged groups and therefore do not migrate in an electric field.
J point on an electrocardiogram, the junction between the end of the QRS segment and the beginning of the ST segment.
jugal point the point at the angle formed by the masseteric and maxillary edges of the zygomatic bone; called also jugale.
lacrimal point a small aperture on a slight elevation at the medial end of the eyelid margin, through which tears from the lacrimal lake enter the lacrimal canaliculi. See also lacrimal apparatus.
point of maximal impulse the point on the chest where the impulse of the left ventricle is sometimes felt or seen most strongly, normally in the fifth costal interspace inside the mammillary line.
McBurney point a point of special tenderness in appendicitis, about 4 to 5 cm from the right anterior iliac spine on a line between the spine and the navel; it corresponds to the normal position of the appendix.
McBurney's point is located midway between the anterior iliac crest and the umbilicus in the right lower quadrant. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2002.
melting point (mp) the minimum temperature at which a solid begins to liquefy; see also freezing point.
near point the nearest point of clear vision, the absolute near point being that for either eye alone with accommodation relaxed, and the relative near point being that for the two eyes together with employment of accommodation.
nodal p's two points on the axis of an optical system situated so that a ray falling on one will produce a parallel ray emerging through the other.
paper point absorbent point.
pressure point
1. a point of extreme sensitivity to pressure.
2. one of various locations on the body at which digital pressure may be applied for the control of hemorrhage.
Locations of pressure points. Shaded areas show the regions in which hemorrhage may be controlled by pressure at the points indicated.
root canal point point (def. 3).
silver point in root canal therapy, a tapered and elongated silver plug that is cemented into the canal as a filling. Called also silver cone.
trigger point a spot on the body at which pressure or other stimulus gives rise to specific sensations or symptoms.
triple point the temperature and pressure at which the solid, liquid, and gas phases of a substance are in equilibrium.

far point

that point in conjugate focus with the retina when the eye is not accommodating.
Synonym(s): punctum remotum

far point

n.
The farthest point at which an object can be seen distinctly by the eye.

far point

(fahr poynt)
That point in conjugate focus with the retina when the eye is not accommodating.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, two near and far points were identified: the near point was the tip of a stick 40 cm away from a constant jaw support, and the far point was marked on a wall 3 meters away from the first point.
The debate has developed in some websites and reached a far point of unreality, and has imposed Arabsat in political and religious debates that Arabsat doesn't have anything to do with it.
Findings by the US Geological Survey so far point to Anbar as a potential flash-point for the focus on the sector of conventional crude oil.
These are not preconditions, but commitments and agreements between us and the Israelis." But he pointed out that there are no signs so far point to the imminent resumption of negotiations.
Then, a couple of years ago, a colleague asked me who I consider to be a truly Jewish designernot as in Ralph Lifshitz, the Jewish boy from the Bronx who created the ultimate sartorial phantasmagoria of the WASP lifestyle, but as in designers who created the fashions that most spoke to the Jewish story of upward mobility, conspicuous consumption, desire for assimilation, and, at some far point, acceptance and even leadership.
Far Point (3.15 Carlisle) A rare runner here for Charlie Mann.
Every January our Earth passes through perihelion, the near point of its elliptical orbit to the Sun, and every July we reach aphelion, the far point. Over thousands of years, the eccentricity of this orbit has been slowly diminishing, so the range between extreme distances is getting less, not more.
rex might also have had a limiting far point of 6 kilometers, compared with the human far point of 1.6 km.
Results are preliminary at this junction but the collected data so far point very dramatically to the success of the program.
Insight Software far point and powder coatings applications will be available early in the new year.
However, when the farther point moved in depth, observers tended to perceive the far point as stationary and the near point as moving.
Comments and observations made thus far point to shortcomings in the book which take away from the insights Browne does offer.