famine


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

famine

(făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. Severe hunger; starvation.
A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare

famine

Pronounced scarcity of food in a broad geographical area, causing widespread starvation, disease, and/or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
Les propos d'Okechi font suite a un appel recent du Haut-Commissaire britannique en Zambie, Fergus Cochrane-Dyet, demandant au gouvernement zambien d'envisager de declarer urgente la situation de famine dans certaines regions du pays afin d'attirer davantage l'aide de la Communaute internationale.
Kindler provides interesting arguments concerning the controversies on whether the famine in Kazakhstan was similar to famines in other regions of the Soviet Union (particularly in Ukraine) and whether this policy constituted a genocide.
In response to the famine in Turkana, Kenyans have expressed a righteous indignation due to the inability to fathom, how in this day and age, in one part of the country, citizens could be dying of hunger, while in other parts, agricultural produce is rotting in the fields due to lack of markets and infrastructure.
The prevalence of acute malnutrition in children exceeds 30% the death rate exceeds two persons per 10,000 persons per day the declaration of a famine carries no binding obligations on the UN or member states, but serves to focus global attention on the problems.
Concerning the famine in Ukraine, David Marples, for instance, has stressed the need to pay attention to the national factor; he has also pointed out that neither Hiroaki Kuromiya nor Terry Martin, thoroughly attentive to national and especially Ukrainian aspects of the famines, has found evidence of a premeditated plan of genocide even while identifying national bias against Ukrainians in the regime's response to policy-made agricultural crisis and famine.
It is hard to disagree with de Waal's claim that the recent 'near eclipse' of famine owes much to political progress--in the broad direction of democratization.
He said "the situation is now much graver" than when he warned of famine in Yemen at the beginning of 2017 and again last November.
Lowcock told the UN's most powerful body that this famine would be "much bigger than anything any professional in this field has seen during their working lives".
Last year more than 20 million people faced famine conditions in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, while 124 million people currently live in crisis levels of food insecurity, requiring urgent humanitarian assistance for their survival, the agencies said.
While the words of the antiquarian George Petrie about the "awful unworldly silence which during the Famine and subsequent years almost everywhere prevailed" are frequently cited, Marguerite Corporaal challenges the representation of post-famine silence with her book Relocated Memories.
Previously, de Waal has coined the term 'famine crime' and he sees it as analogous to other atrocities which are 'primarily political projects that consider (some) human lives expendable or worthless.' Think, for instance, of the starvation provoked by colonialism, or Mao's Great Leap Forward, or, more recently by conflict in sub-Saharan Africa.
(Famine is a technical measure, assessed by the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, which cites hunger on a scale of one to five).