familial Alzheimer's disease


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familial Alzheimer's disease

n.
An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease caused by a defect on a particular chromosome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mullan et al., "Segregation of a missense mutation in the amyloid precursor protein gene with familial Alzheimer's disease," Nature, vol.
(39.) Scheuner, D., et al, (1996), "Secreted amyloid beta-protein similar to that in the senile plaques of Alzheimer's disease is increased in vivo by the presenilin 1 and 2 and APP mutations linked to familial Alzheimer's disease," Nature Medicine, 2(8), 864-870.
Especially DIAN is performed with mutation carriers before the onset of familial Alzheimer's disease, thus outcome is expected.
Zheng, "Presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer's disease mutation leads to defective associative learning and impaired adult neurogenesis," Neuroscience, vol.
Rogaeva et al., "Familial Alzheimer's disease in kindreds with missense mutations in a gene on chromosome 1 related to the Alzheimer's disease type 3 gene," Nature, vol.
Cloning of a gene bearing missense mutations in early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Nature 1995 Jun;375(6534):754-760.
DIEGO--Robust behavioral changes are not common in presymptomatic familial Alzheimer's disease, but increases in certain behaviors such as agitation, apathy, and appetitive changes can accompany early cognitive changes, results from a large ongoing study demonstrated.
The findings "'are consistent with observations in late-onset Alzheimer's disease and support behavioral changes in familial Alzheimer's disease being a state associated with incipient Alzheimer's pathology rather than a life-long disposition," Dr.
Joanne's mother had been in the final stages of early onset and familial Alzheimer's disease, which is a type of dementia that affects people under the age of 65 and is caused by a genetic malfunction which is passed through generations.
Specific deficit of colour-colour short-term memory binding in sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychologia.

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