falsify

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fal·si·fy

(fawlsi-fī)
The deliberate action of telling, writing, or documenting information that is inaccurate or incomplete.
See also: falsification
References in periodicals archive ?
--to research feasibility, taking into account the aim of the work, of simultaneous use of blocks of different (non-standard) shape for detection of falsification regions in DI;
Thus, first of all it is necessary to use splitting of its matrix into square blocks at simultaneous use of square, triangular, round blocks and blocks of irregular shape in process of detection of falsification regions in DI.
If the friction is the possibility of hidden income falsification, then increasing marginal income tax rates may be optimal.
However, the optimality of progressive income taxation obtained in our income falsification environment is consistent with the observed progressivity of income tax systems used in many countries, including the United States.
and Yoshiaki Tsutsumi, the effective owner of the Seibu group, demanding 4.26 billion yen in damages for the investment loss it incurred due to the falsification of Seibu's financial statements.
The falsification was designed to enable the railway operator to clear a Tokyo Stock Exchange rule that any firm be delisted if a combined stake held in a firm by its top 10 shareholders exceeds 80 percent for more than one year.
By reducing the number of computer entries investigators need to compare to hard-copy evidence (for example, canceled checks, vouchers, or invoices), downloading permits easy detection of any discrepancy and/or falsification the embezzler used to conceal the crime.
The report said it was not possible to establish a motive for the falsifications but the tedium of manually checking fuel pellets and the ease with which the computer data logging system could be manipulated were seen to be contributory factors.
The NII's recommendations call for all those involved in the falsification to be disciplined and for there to be a period of retraining.
Few fail to notice that the discourse of falsification, particularly as harnessed to a high-level state effort to combat it, carries with it a particularly Soviet ring.
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Nazi-Soviet Pact, and in light of this as well as ongoing battles with official Ukrainian positions on genocide and the famine of 1933, the falsification commission could well be directed initially against historical battles in the Baltic states, Poland, and the "near abroad." However, fears of more systemic measures were raised on 23 June 2009, when Valerii Aleksandrovich Tishkov, academician and deputy secretary (zamestitel" akademika-sekretaria) and head of the history section (rukovoditel" sektsii istorii) of the Historico-Philological Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, sent out a circular letter to the directors of member institutions.
There are important empirical differences in the real world between claiming inductively that we can infer from some finite accumulation of "credible" supportive evidence that something is a fact or works well, and seeing a falsification based on rigorous tests.