falsetto


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fal·set·to

(fawl-set'tō),
Descriptive of phonation at an unnaturally high frequency.
[It., fr. falso, false, + -etto, dim. suffix]

fal·set·to

(fawl-set'tō)
High-pitched voice produced by vibration of the anterior third of the vocal folds while the posterior folds are tightly adducted.
See also: voice
[It., fr. falso, false, + -etto, dim. suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
Singer Peter Silberman's melancholic falsetto still holds the capacity to stand hairs on end.
So with this in mind I have started to (whisper it quietly and don't tell any of the mates I go to watch Cardiff City with) sing falsetto.
But the biggest surprise of the night was Higgs' falsetto which flopped and for the main part was drowned out by uneven sound.
Ben Bridwell's voice does continue to sprinkle psychedelia, with falsetto vocals that nod toward the Flaming Lips' Wayne Coyne and Mercury Rev's Jonathan Donahue.
The soothing lead vocal is augmented by falsetto backing vocals, dreamy layers and copious handclap moments.
With just 3,100 miles from new, the 190mph LP5000S was bought by the falsetto crooner in 1984 and sold to a collector in 1988.
He has his own way of tackling the famous Orbison falsetto. ``It's a matter of learning how to sing properly and - without getting too boring - about the breathing.
A motley bunch they were, wearing leather, spandex, and heels on stage ('cept for Gil and Enid, they wore Converse), belting it out in a natural falsetto that idiots like Dio and Geddy Lee wish they were born with.
Slezak's women are neither too masculine nor falsetto, and his knack for infusing both compassion and self-interest to the characters adds that oomph of multi-dimensionality that brings audio alive.
The play, subtitled "A Junk Opera," and its music, composed and performed by falsetto Martyn Jacques, take their inspiration from Heinrich Hoffmann's 19th-century children's book Struwwelpeter.
The other anchor is called falsetto or light head voice, which is described by a vibratory mechanism labeled M2.
There was a time in Sarah Geronimo's career, she once admitted, when she almost lost her voice-it would quiver; her falsetto would at times abandon her.