false vocal cord


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Related to false vocal cord: True vocal cords

ves·tib·u·lar fold

[TA]
one of the pair of folds of mucous membrane overlying the vestibular ligaments that stretch across the laryngeal cavity from the angle of the thyroid cartilage to the arytenoid cartilage; the right and left pair enclose a space called the rima vestibuli or false glottis, and form the superior boundary of the laryngeal ventricle.

ves·tib·u·lar fold

(ves-tib'yū-lăr fōld) [TA]
One of the pair of folds of mucous membrane stretching across the laryngeal cavity from the angle of the thyroid cartilage to the arytenoid cartilage; they enclose a space called the rima vestibuli or false glottis.
Synonym(s): plica vestibularis [TA] , false vocal cord, ventricular band of larynx, ventricular fold.
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VOCAL CORDS: Vocal cords (closed, seen endoscopically)
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VOCAL CORDS: Vocal cords (open, seen endoscopically)
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VOCAL CORDS

vocal cord

Either of two thin, reedlike folds of tissue within the larynx that vibrate as air passes between them, producing sounds that are the basis of speech.

false vocal cord

Ventricular fold of the larynx.

true vocal cord

Vocal fold. See: illustration
References in periodicals archive ?
High-resolution computed tomography was obtained revealing a 4.2 cm cranio-caudal soft tissue mass in the larynx extending from the epiglottis down through the level of the false vocal cords, vestibule, and true vocal cords.
The supraglottic index (SGI) uses a scale to score for the presence of edema and erythema /hyperemia in the epiglottis, false vocal cords, and arytenoid cartilage, as well as secretions or mucosal thickening of the piriform recess and posterior commissure.
The false vocal cords, also known as the ventricular or vestibular folds, are two thick, sagittally oriented, individually sized mucosal duplications arising from the wall into the lumen of the supraglottic space and forming the medial wall of the laryngeal ventricle (Kutta et al., 2004).