false self

false self

Alternative psychology
A term defined in the context of Swami Ajaya’s inner self-healing process as a false image that a person portrays to the world, which is his or her response to the constellation of ills and poor fortunes suffered in the course of life.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
I doubt Trump would have any interest in struggling with a true and false self. His behavior suggests his false self pretends to have regard for anyone but himself.
The former could be called a false self, while the latter a true self.
Kundalini awakenings can have profound physical, emotional, and mental effects, making it difficult to cope with everyday life, yet these powerful awakenings can also allow you to release past trauma, see past the illusions of the false self, and awaken your spiritual heart, enabling you to recognize the divine self.
A meditating Buddhist for much of his life, he made work that appears as though he was waiting for the special moment of spiritual enlightenment (or satori), when one abandons the compliance of the False Self (or a particular mode of artmaking) for the spontaneous creativity of the True Self (with its many facets of expression), to reference the distinction made by psychoanalyst D.
'We have this sort of false self we portray over the internet.
She addresses the therapeutic alliance, counter-transference, being playful, defense mechanisms, personality disorders, Self Psychology, the false self, working with couples, the developmental perspective, assessing the patient, and self-supervision and note-taking.
Charles Whitfield, an American physician, psychotherapist, and author of 'Healing the Child Within,' refers to the inner child as the 'real self,' which he describes as 'energetic and creative' and 'whose innate desire is to grow and express itself.' The opposite, he says, is the false self: pretentious, self-absorbed, constricting, rebellious.
Furthermore, Winnicott has also provided very useful insights into understanding the nature of self by introducing two concepts including the "false self" and the "true self" (Winnicott, 1956).
The transcendence of the survival mission (learning to renounce the perpetual self-protection of the ego or, to put it differently, the renunciation to the false self, the imposed self), starts from the conscious perception of one's fears (Richard Moss, 2009).
that drives this false self identity is fear of abandonment.
A lack of appropriate response may lead to what Laing (1960/1965) described as the false self. Self-consciousness only emerges in the context of a primary caregiving relationship.
As we spend more of our lives plugged into these interfaces, we worship at the altar of a false self: how we wish we were, how we want to be perceived.