false positive


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Related to false positive: False Positive Rate

false pos·i·tive

(fawls poz'i-tiv),
1. A test result that erroneously assigns a patient to a specific diagnostic or reference group, due particularly to insufficiently exact methods of testing.
2. A patient whose test results include that person in a particular diagnostic group to which the person may not truly belong.
3. Term commonly used to denote a false-positive result.

false positive

n.
A test result that is false-positive.

false positive

a test result that wrongly indicates the presence of a disease or other condition the test is designed to reveal. Compare false negative.

false positive

A term of art referring to a person with a positive test result, who does not have a target condition.

false positive

Lab medicine A test result from a Pt who does not have a particular disease, which is positive or detects an analyte that is usually normal. See Four cell diagnostic matrix, Cf False negative.

false pos·i·tive

(fawls poz'i-tiv)
1. A test result that erroneously assigns a person to a specific diagnostic or reference group.
2. A person included by erroneous test results in a particular diagnostic group.
3. A false-positive test result.

False positive

Test results showing a problem when one does not exist.
Mentioned in: Stress Test

false positive

; FP inaccurate investigative or diagnostic test response, giving a 'yes' response, where the correct response should be 'no'; pathological conditions are misdiagnosed as being present (see sensitivity; specificity)

specificity 

The extent to which a test gives results that are free from false positives (i.e. people found to have the defect when they are actually free of it). The fewer the number of false positives, the greater is the specificity of the test. It is usually presented as the percentage of people truly identified as not defectives, or normal, referred to as true negatives, D (or correct reject), divided by the total number of not defectives or normal people tested. The total number includes all the true negatives, D, plus the false positives, B (or false alarm). Hence
See sensitivity.

false pos·i·tive

(fawls poz'i-tiv)
1. A test result that erroneously assigns a patient to a specific diagnostic or reference group, due particularly to insufficiently exact methods of testing.
2. A patient whose test results include that person in a particular diagnostic group to which the person may not truly belong.
3. Term commonly used to denote a false-positive reaction (q.v.).

false

said of diseases or plants that have a superficial resemblance to another plant or disease.

false acacia
false blackleg
cellulitis and myositis caused by Clostridium septicum and C. novyi. More commonly called malignant edema. Characterized by high fever, severe toxemia and local swelling around a wound with subsequent local gangrene and a high mortality rate.
false blusher
see amanitapantherina—a mushroom.
false buckbush
see gyrostemonaustralasicus.
false bursa
see hygroma.
false castor oil plant
daturastramonium, D. ferox.
false columnaris disease
similar to columnaris disease but caused by infection with the bacteria Cytophaga johnsonae. Characterized by skin erosion especially at the fins and jaws.
false distemper
a disease of horses with some similarity to strangles. See pectoral abscess.
false garlic
alliumvineale.
false gid
see oestrusovis.
false hellebore
veratrumcalifornicum, V. viride.
false indigo
false joint
a fracture in a long bone that does not heal; the ends callus over and there is mobility at the point.
false layer
a hen with all the appearances and the behavior of a laying hen but which does not lay any eggs. There is a defect in ovum entrapment and the eggs are discharged into the peritoneal cavity although egg peritonitis is not apparent.
false lupine
thermopsismontana, T. rhombifolia.
false negative
when the result of a test in a patient is negative when the disease or condition which is the subject of the search is present.
false positive
false quarter
a condition of the horse's hoof in which a serious injury to the coronet causes an overgrowth of horn which overlaps the normal wall.
false scorpions
members of the order Pseudoscorpiones. Nonvenomous arachnids called also book scorpions.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) Of these 128 false positives reported, 53 patients were taking bupropion at the time of the test.
In effect, the costs of a false positive are increased as new facts are brought to bear.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration said the federal government has required confirmatory tests for its employees since 1988 to help eliminate false positives.
Implementing RTA to identify false positives and immediately refer to care.
One way to remove false positives is to eliminate them using smart data-collection technology, reducing the volume of likely threat data to the correlation engine.
Clearly, we must expect to have a large proportion of false positives for any single, practical screening procedure that we use to gain evidence for managing risks from important and well-characterized but rare hazards.
This study serves to illustrate that most false positive marks are caused by an abnormal finding.
20-40% reduction in daily false positives with no additional false negatives.
False positive readings can cost a woman and her family dearly, both in emotional worry and in having extensive, unnecessary and expensive tests done to confirm the reading, said the researchers, led by Dr.
The three tests the NIH panel reviewed prevent few cases of disease not prevented by other means, and they yield many false positive results -- forcing blood banks to dump hundreds of thousands of units of good blood, the panel members assert.
According to Bozorgi, while lenders are absolutely concerned with eliminating or mitigating losses due to fraud, dealing with the high expense and opportunity costs associated with high false positive rates can also be extremely costly.
With the rate of AIDS-causing HIV infection so low in most segments of society, critics argue that the low but persistent rate of false positive results inherent in the screening test makes large-scale screening more trouble than it's worth.