fall

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fall

 [fawl]
a coming down freely, usually under the influence of gravity.
risk for f's a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as increased susceptibility to falling that may cause physical harm.

fall

Drug slang
verb A regional term meaning to get arrested (for drug-related crime).

Public health
noun A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher to a lower position, which is often accompanied by injuries.
 
Epidemiology
30% of those > 65 years old fall/year; 10–15% suffer injuries, such as fractures of the hip (1%) and other sites (5%), and soft tissue injuries (5%); it is the 6th-leading cause of death in the elderly.
 
Risk factors
Postural hypotension; use of sedatives; use of 4+ prescription medicines; impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in activities of daily living and a increased risk of institutionalisation.

Management
Fall risk in the elderly can be decreased with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance and resistance training, behaviour modification, and adjustment of medications.

fall

Public health A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher position, which may be accompanied by injuries Epidemiology 30% of those > 65 yrs old fall/yr; 10-15% suffer injuries–eg, hip Fx–1% and other sites–5%, and soft tissue injuries–5%; it is the 6th leading cause of death in the elderly Risk factors Postural hypotension, use of sedatives, use of 4+ prescription medicines, impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance, or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in ADL and a ↑ risk of institutionalization; fall risk in the elderly can be ↓ with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance, and resistance training, behavior modification, adjustment of medications
References in periodicals archive ?
This fall bundle included visual cues to identify a patient as high risk for falling, and to increase awareness and communication among caregivers who interact with patients.
This means HIV providers have 2 easy-to-use frailty measures that can tell them which people with HIV run a higher risk of falling. In the walking-speed test, walking 4 meters (4.4 yards) at a pace slower than 1 meter per second indicates slow speed.
Falls were assessed by asking patients about their history of falling in the past 12 months, the number of falls (one or multiple falls), and the context of the last fall.
(10) A fall index derived from the Tetrax balance parameters has been developed to produce a score that will express the patient's risk of falling based on the specific balance factors that affect falling.
For example, while health providers can assess older patients for balance and gait, many older adults also benefit from an assessment of their homes, where modifications can help reduce tripping and falling hazards.
The possibility of underreporting by staff is a cause for concern because falling can be normal in the pediatric population related to age and developmental growth (Pauley et al., 2014).
The falling of a patient's body to the ground or another surface without expectation was included.
Despite growing up falling down, it was still a shock when I had my first MS-related fall.
Inability to get up after falling, subsequent time on floor, and summoning help: Prospective cohort study in people over 90.
Possible falls were chosen through the simple threshold and then applied to the HMM to solve the problems such as deviation of interpersonal falling behavioral patterns and similar fall actions.
The Morse Fall Risk Assessment tool consists of six items reflecting risk factors for falling such as: (i) history of falling, (ii) secondary diagnosis, (iii) ambulatory aids, (iv) intravenous therapy, (v) type of gait and (vi) mental status.
People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at high risk of falls, and those who have fallen once are at greater risk of repeat falls due to previous injuries and a greater fear of falling, according to a new study from the University of Manchester, UK.