fall


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fall

 [fawl]
a coming down freely, usually under the influence of gravity.
risk for f's a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as increased susceptibility to falling that may cause physical harm.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fall

Drug slang
verb A regional term meaning to get arrested (for drug-related crime).

Public health
noun A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher to a lower position, which is often accompanied by injuries.
 
Epidemiology
30% of those > 65 years old fall/year; 10–15% suffer injuries, such as fractures of the hip (1%) and other sites (5%), and soft tissue injuries (5%); it is the 6th-leading cause of death in the elderly.
 
Risk factors
Postural hypotension; use of sedatives; use of 4+ prescription medicines; impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in activities of daily living and a increased risk of institutionalisation.

Management
Fall risk in the elderly can be decreased with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance and resistance training, behaviour modification, and adjustment of medications.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fall

Public health A precipitous drop from a height, or from a higher position, which may be accompanied by injuries Epidemiology 30% of those > 65 yrs old fall/yr; 10-15% suffer injuries–eg, hip Fx–1% and other sites–5%, and soft tissue injuries–5%; it is the 6th leading cause of death in the elderly Risk factors Postural hypotension, use of sedatives, use of 4+ prescription medicines, impaired arm or leg movement, strength, balance, or gait; fall survivors suffer from functional decline in ADL and a ↑ risk of institutionalization; fall risk in the elderly can be ↓ with exercise and endurance, flexibility, dynamic balance, and resistance training, behavior modification, adjustment of medications
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Washington State, generally, fall protection is required at 4 feet in construction.
Second, in a pilot study, 30 consecutive psychogeriatric inpatients were assessed for fall risk using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) and the Wilson Sims Fall Risk Assessment Tool (WSFRAT).
The gradual introduction of interventions to complete a comprehensive fall prevention program allowed staff members to incorporate the interventions into their daily practice in maintaining patient safety and preventing falls.
Among the 174 people who fell at least once, 37 (21%) received medical care after the fall and 9 (5%) broke a bone because of the fall.
The characteristics of the participants, including age, disease duration, active clinical findings, fall history (during the last 12 months), fear of falling, and drugs usage were recorded.
Other fall-related resources at CDC include "Preventing Falls: A Guide To Implementing Effective Community-Based Fall Prevention Programs," the second edition of which was released in 2015.
Among the three types of companies, drilling contractor workers experienced both the largest proportion of fatal fall injuries (38; 60%) and the highest fall-associated fatality rate (4.5 deaths per 100,000 workers).
According to OSHA, the final rule gives employers the flexibility to select the fall protection system that works best for them, choosing from a range of options including active fall protection, positioning and restraint, and personal fall arrest systems.
Rouse and colleagues (2014) looked at the implementation of the Humpty Dumpty Fall Scale as a quality improvement (QI) project for the emergency departments, birth centers, NICUs, and pediatric units at Palomar Pomerado Health.